CASE STUDY: Sea Ray Charts New Course with Production Help from Proto Labs

Brunswick Corp.’s Sea Ray luxury boat brand is known for its high-end, opulent yachts that often command seven-figure sales tags. As you might expect, no detail is considered too small, not even something as seemingly mundane as the air-conditioning drainage system on Sea Ray’s L650 Fly model (pictured).

So, when the boat builder redesigned its AC drain-line arrangement, and then extended that new design from the L650 Fly to two other Sea Ray models, the company created a significant supply challenge, which Proto Labs was called on to meet.

The grill was manufactured in a durable, corrosion-resistant ABS plastic at Proto Labs.

“Proto Labs was definitely able to help us more seamlessly go from prototype to production, which is important in our market, to be able to make that transition quickly,” said Randy Hasson, project leader with Brunswick’s recreational boat group in Merritt Island, Florida.

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WEBINAR: Accelerate Design Validation with Proto Labs, Autodesk

There’s still time to register for the webinar, “Accelerating Design Validation with Instant DFM and Pricing Feedback,” set for 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25. Jointly hosted by CAD software maker Autodesk, and Proto Labs, this free webinar shows you how to:

  • Reduce design risks with design for manufacturability (DFM) feedback
  • Slash weeks or months off your prototyping phase
  • Validate your designs early and often with DFM analysis and pricing feedback
  • Use a seamless system of CAD software and online quoting

Autodesk’s Fusion 360 CAD software has Proto Labs’ instant online quoting feature with DFM analysis integrated into its application. This session teaches you how these capabilities work together.

REGISTER NOW TO ATTEND

Injection Molding: Aluminum vs. Steel Tooling

Aluminum molds are milled in rapid CNC machines.

Conventional injection molding typically uses steel tooling capable of producing millions of parts, however, it often takes months to manufacture a mold and a capital investment of $50,000 or more. But what if production demands call for smaller quantities? That’s where aluminum tooling is ideal. Here’s a quick look at the differences between steel and aluminum tooling.

Low-Volume Production with Aluminum Tooling

  • Mold production AND parts within 15 days or less
  • Low manufacturing costs with molds beginning around $1,500
  • Production quantities of up to 10,000 parts or more; depending on material type and geometry, some molds are capable of producing hundreds of thousands of parts
  • Simplified mold designs decrease manufacturing time and cost
  • Single and multi-cavity tooling: 1-, 2-, 4- and 8-cavity molds are possible depending on part size and complexity
  • Thermoplastic and thermoset materials identical to that of high-volume production materials; more than 100 different materials can be used including ABS, PC, PP, LCP, POM, and liquid silicone rubber
  • No maintenance fees and lifetime replacement of mold if damaged
  • Improved heat dissipation and without the need for messy cooling lines
  • Inexpensive mold-safe tooling modifications

High-Volume Production with Steel Tooling

  • Lower part cost when quantities increase
  • Part production in the millions
  • Multi-cavity tooling greater than 8 cavities
  • Part complexity can be increased
  • More finishing options

If you part volumes don’t stretch into the millions, if you need on-demand production parts within days, and if you’re looking to avoid risky tooling investments before your part design is truly validated, low-volume injection molding with an aluminum tool might be good option.

Once an aluminum mold is ready, part production begins almost immediately. This allows manufacturing to finish every order in three weeks or less.

At Proto Labs, we include a free interactive design for manufacturability (DFM) review within a few hours in every injection molding quote. In the time it takes to get the initial quote from a high-volume production molder, you can have several design reviews and a mold already in production.

If you have any further questions about rapid manufacturing at Proto Labs, check out protolabs.com or contact one of our application engineers at 877.479.3680 or customerservice@protolabs.com.

THE SHORT LIST: See You at Trade Shows This Fall

Look for the Proto Labs booth at various trade shows this fall. Here’s a brief roundup of where you’ll find us:

SEPTEMBER SHOWS

IMTS-Chicago-Sept. 12-17

The International Manufacturing Technology Show at Chicago’s McCormick Place is the largest manufacturing show in the Americas and will feature more than 2,000 exhibiting companies and over 114,000 registrants. Visit us at booth N-72 throughout the week. Proto Labs staffers are also presenting at the conference:

  • Jonathan Bissmeyer, Senior Quality Engineer: “Designing for the DMLS Process,” 1:15 p.m., Monday, Sept. 12, Room W192-B.
  • Greg Thompson, Global Product Manager: “Designing for Direct Metal Laser Sintering and Selective Laser Sintering,” 3:30 p.m., at the Additive Manufacturing Conference (co-located with IMTS).

    At a recent trade show in New York, Proto Labs staffers found time for a photo. From left, Eric Utley, Jenna Nyman, Abby Christensen, Kory Dirnberger, and Charlie Johnson.

MD&M-Minneapolis-Sept. 21-22

Medical Design & Manufacturing at Minneapolis’ Convention Center is the region’s largest medical technology event, with 5,000 industry professionals expected to attend. See us at booth 525.

As part of the show’s programming, Rich Baker, Proto Labs’ Chief Technology Officer, will present, “More Than Prototyping: Digital Manufacturing’s Role in Industry 4.0,” at 3:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21. Baker also will participate in a panel discussion on “3D Printing: The Brave New World of Manufacturing” at 11 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 22.

Device Talks-Boston-Sept. 28

Now in its fifth year, this gathering of medical technology professionals will include a day of workshops, panel discussions, and networking at the Boston Marriott Long Wharf.

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DESIGN TIP: Choosing Industrial 3D Printing for Production Parts

Using 3D printing for fully functional end-use metal and plastic parts is becoming increasingly common in rapid manufacturing with industrial-grade processes like direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and selective laser sintering (SLS).

Industrial-grade 3D printing is well suited to produce organic shapes, like this nylon turbine (left) and end-use production parts such as this titanium drill component (right).

With an expanding material selection and improving material properties, designers and engineers have another good option for small quantities of production parts.

Accordingly, our monthly design tip covers this emerging trend.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Choosing the best 3D printing process for your application
  • Selecting the right thermoplastic and metal materials
  • Designing part geometry for 3D printing
  • Using SL, SLS, and DMLS for end-use production parts

READ FULL DESIGN TIP