Meet the Cool Idea! Award Judges: Andy MacInnis

The Cool Idea! Award judges are technologists, innovators, entrepreneurs, instructors, and some are even past Cool Idea! Award recipients. All of our judges have a story worth sharing, so we sat down with each for a quick Q&A to help you get to know them a bit better.

Andy MacInnis is a director at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Andy MacInnis is the technical instructor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He leads the Integrated Design & Management (IDM) track, which takes a hands-on and practical approach to design. Prior to his position at MIT, Andy founded Monster Prototype—a leading go-to model and prototype firm in the Boston area. At Monster Prototype, he consulted companies developing consumer products, medical devices, and footwear.

What are you looking forward to most about being a Cool Idea! Award judge in 2017?
Seeing where inventors find the junction of Need and Solution.

Tell us about your background—what’s something about your professional life that we wouldn’t necessarily know by looking at your LinkedIn profile?
I find the challenge of repairing old things like cars, boats, houses, and bikes rewarding and worthwhile. Continue reading

DESIGN TIP: 9 Ways to Reduce Injection-Molded Part Costs

Multi-cavity and family molds are used for a higher volume of parts, which can save costs. Shown here is an example of a family mold, used to produce the med-device part pictured.

Product designers and engineers love to trim costs on manufactured parts. This month’s design tip offers a number of injection molding considerations to improve part design and stretch your manufacturing dollar.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Eliminating undercuts
  • Getting rid of unnecessary features
  • Using a core cavity approach
  • Altering cosmetic finish
  • Designing self-mating parts
  • Modifying and reusing molds
  • Leveraging DFM analysis
  • Using a multi-cavity or family mold
  • Considering part size

READ FULL DESIGN TIP

Meet the Cool Idea! Award Judges: Chris Boyle

Chris Boyle and his company, SOLOSHOT, won the Cool Idea! Award in 2012.

The Cool Idea! Award judges are technologists, innovators, entrepreneurs, instructors, and some are even past Cool Idea! Award recipients. All of our judges have a story worth sharing, so we sat down with each for a quick Q&A to help you get to know them a bit better. In our first installment, we’re talking with Chris Boyle.

Chris is a biomedical engineer and entrepreneur from Queens, New York. He founded his first company at the age of 22, which led to a license agreement with a Fortune 50 medical device company. Since then, he has launched and funded multiple startups that range from consumer electronics to apparel. His most recent endeavor is SOLOSHOT—an object-tracking camera and recipient of the Cool Idea! Award. Chris’ close ties to the startup community and experience winning the Cool Idea! Award add a unique perspective to our panel of judges.

What are you looking forward to most about being a Cool Idea! Award judge in 2017?
I really enjoy seeing the combination of scientific and entrepreneurial passion. At its core, it’s both about combining problem solving with a passionate work ethic and it’s exciting to see those two things come together very early in the process.

Tell us about your background – what’s something about your professional life that we wouldn’t necessarily know by looking at your LinkedIn profile?
I created and sold a TV show to BermanBraun about Kiteboarding in the Dominican Republic. Continue reading

Webinar Round-Up: 3D Printing Materials, CNC Machining, and More

We wrapped up 2017 with two webinars on rapid manufacturing. First, we discussed how to design efficient parts for CNC machining. Then we shared tips on how to select the right material for your 3D-printed parts. Both are available on demand.

Stay tuned for what’s to come in 2017. We’ll be kicking off the new year by looking at how to leverage on-demand production to reduce manufacturing costs and manage demand volatility.

Proto Labs’ On-Demand Webinars 
Below you’ll find our complete library of webinars—just click the title to watch.

Designing for Rapid Overmolding

  • Design factors that determine the quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength

Designing for 3D Printing: Selective Laser Sintering

  • SLS material considerations
  • Design guidelines for functional prototypes and production parts

How to Choose the Right Thermoplastic Material

  • Factors in thermoplastic material selection
  • Overview of common thermoplastics including the effects of additives

Designing for 3D Printing: Direct Metal Laser Sintering

  •  DMLS design considerations including surface finishes, internal features, stresses, and support requirements.
  • Reducing multi-part assemblies into a single component

DESIGN TIP: 6 Undercut Techniques to Improve Moldability

Undercuts are those complex features in an injection-molded part that prevent its ejection from the mold. They can be found on thousands of everyday parts, from the threads on a fastener to the slot for the power switch on a smart phone case.

The left image (1), illustrates a clip with undercut feature. The right image (2), shows an access hole beneath the undercut that allows the mold to protrude through the part and provide the needed latch shutoff geometry.

In our latest tip, we cover different injection molding design techniques to successfully integrate undercuts, and ultimately, improve overall part moldability.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Parting lines
  • Side-actions
  • Bumpoffs
  • Hand-loaded inserts
  • Telescoping shutoffs
  • Additional considerations

READ FULL DESIGN TIP