CASE STUDY: Sea Ray Charts New Course with Production Help from Proto Labs

Brunswick Corp.’s Sea Ray luxury boat brand is known for its high-end, opulent yachts that often command seven-figure sales tags. As you might expect, no detail is considered too small, not even something as seemingly mundane as the air-conditioning drainage system on Sea Ray’s L650 Fly model (pictured).

So, when the boat builder redesigned its AC drain-line arrangement, and then extended that new design from the L650 Fly to two other Sea Ray models, the company created a significant supply challenge, which Proto Labs was called on to meet.

The grill was manufactured in a durable, corrosion-resistant ABS plastic at Proto Labs.

“Proto Labs was definitely able to help us more seamlessly go from prototype to production, which is important in our market, to be able to make that transition quickly,” said Randy Hasson, project leader with Brunswick’s recreational boat group in Merritt Island, Florida.


WEBINAR: Accelerate Design Validation with Proto Labs, Autodesk

There’s still time to register for the webinar, “Accelerating Design Validation with Instant DFM and Pricing Feedback,” set for 3 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25. Jointly hosted by CAD software maker Autodesk, and Proto Labs, this free webinar shows you how to:

  • Reduce design risks with design for manufacturability (DFM) feedback
  • Slash weeks or months off your prototyping phase
  • Validate your designs early and often with DFM analysis and pricing feedback
  • Use a seamless system of CAD software and online quoting

Autodesk’s Fusion 360 CAD software has Proto Labs’ instant online quoting feature with DFM analysis integrated into its application. This session teaches you how these capabilities work together.


DESIGN TIP: Choosing Industrial 3D Printing for Production Parts

Using 3D printing for fully functional end-use metal and plastic parts is becoming increasingly common in rapid manufacturing with industrial-grade processes like direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and selective laser sintering (SLS).

Industrial-grade 3D printing is well suited to produce organic shapes, like this nylon turbine (left) and end-use production parts such as this titanium drill component (right).

With an expanding material selection and improving material properties, designers and engineers have another good option for small quantities of production parts.

Accordingly, our monthly design tip covers this emerging trend.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Choosing the best 3D printing process for your application
  • Selecting the right thermoplastic and metal materials
  • Designing part geometry for 3D printing
  • Using SL, SLS, and DMLS for end-use production parts


Proto Labs Garners Top Workplace Honor for 6th Straight Year

For the sixth consecutive year, Proto Labs has been recognized as a Top Workplace by Workplace Dynamics, a national survey firm that researches participating companies through confidential employee surveys.

The firm looks at individual factors such as employee wages and management, but also aspects that include career potential and a company’s future. The survey is conducted in 50 U.S. markets and local results are compiled by Minneapolis’ Star Tribune.

Welcome to the “Code Cave,” a new collaboration area inside renovated office space at Proto Labs’ Maple Plain, Minn. headquarters.

Our company is one of 110 Minnesota-based employers that scored high enough to qualify as a Top Workplace against Workplace Dynamics’ national benchmark.

On a related note, providing employees with a work environment that supports productivity and nurtures innovation is a key aspect of being a top workplace. Along these lines, the vacated production area on the lower floor of Proto Labs’ headquarters building in Maple Plain was recently renovated and converted into office space. That office area is now home to software engineers, web developers, and other technology-based roles. High-tech conference centers are sprinkled throughout and there’s even a “Code Cave” (see photo). Additionally, we’ve opened a new, larger 3D-printing facility in Cary, N.C.

Though the Workplace Dynamics survey covered only Minnesota employees, Proto Labs globally now includes 1,600 employees in 12 locations in eight countries.

DESIGN TIP: Cutting Corners on Injection-Molded Parts

Sharp corners definitely have their place in part design, but they often spell trouble when injection molding plastic parts. Accordingly, designers should be aware of the pitfalls associated with “being square” when developing parts. Indeed, part accuracy, strength, and aesthetics suffer without the right amount of corner rounding and filleting.

This month’s design tip explores ways to strengthen injection-molded parts while reducing costs with proper placement of corner radii and fillet. You’ll learn about:

  • Material selection. Some plastics are more forgiving of sharp-cornered parts. Choosing the right one for your application is a necessary step towards accurate, functional parts.
  • Wall thickness. Beefing up adjacent walls may absorb some of the stress associated with sharp internal corners, but can create other design challenges.
  • Part geometry. Some parts are simply more “moldable” than others. Achieving proper form, fit and function depends on sound part design, a large piece of which is appropriate corner radii.