DESIGN TIP: 6 Undercut Techniques to Improve Moldability

Undercuts are those complex features in an injection-molded part that prevent its ejection from the mold. They can be found on thousands of everyday parts, from the threads on a fastener to the slot for the power switch on a smart phone case.

The left image (1), illustrates a clip with undercut feature. The right image (2), shows an access hole beneath the undercut that allows the mold to protrude through the part and provide the needed latch shutoff geometry.

In our latest tip, we cover different injection molding design techniques to successfully integrate undercuts, and ultimately, improve overall part moldability.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Parting lines
  • Side-actions
  • Bumpoffs
  • Hand-loaded inserts
  • Telescoping shutoffs
  • Additional considerations

READ FULL DESIGN TIP

Take Full Advantage of CNC Machining’s Capabilities

Product designers in need of prototypes or end-use parts frequently turn to CNC machining for its quick-turn capabilities. Machining isn’t new, but just like any other digital technology, its functionality has expanded in recent years.

That’s why we assembled some tips for how to get the most out of today’s CNC machining. This will help you design higher quality machined parts and better use CNC machining to bolster your product development efforts.

Our Design Essentials for CNC Machining covers the following topics:

  • Designing cylindrical parts to be turned
  • Threading
  • Transition from 3D printing to machining
  • Outsourcing to a machine shop
  • Cost reduction tips for CNC machine

Click here to download Design Essentials for CNC Machining.

DESIGN TIP: 6 Ways to Cut Costs with 3D Printing

Reduced cost of development as well as part production can certainly be achieved with industrial 3D printing processes, like selective laser sintering and direct metal laser sintering, but there are a few design rules you need to keep in mind.

Here is DMLS in action, as the machine sinters each layer. This process is repeated layer by layer until the build is complete.

This month’s design tip from Proto Labs discusses:

  • Optimizing part design for 3D printing
  • Embracing non-traditional design techniques like organic features
  • Designing for manufacturability if larger quantities are needed
  • Minimizing overhangs and other unfriendly features
  • Avoiding “over-tolerancing” your parts
  • Factoring in your product’s overall functionality in addition to cost reductions

READ FULL DESIGN TIP.

Rapid Overmolding: Consider These 3 Elements

Injection molding is a common, cost-effective method for manufacturing parts, but, sometimes, those parts need a little help. Low impact or vibration resistance, slippery surfaces, poor ergonomics, and cosmetic concerns are only a few of the reasons why a second molded part is often added as a grip, handle, cover, or sleeve.

Proto Labs now offers rapid overmolding for parts, including the three samples pictured here.

The process of rapid overmolding will get the job done. This method, which Proto Labs now offers, and is the focus of our October design tip, uses a mechanical or chemical bond (or both) to permanently marry two parts together.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Bonding: A strong bond between the two materials is critical to overmolding.
  • Materials: This is a key consideration in overmolding.
  • Principles: Overmolding uses the same playbook as injection molding, but with a few quirks.

READ FULL DESIGN TIP

DESIGN TIP: Choosing Industrial 3D Printing for Production Parts

Using 3D printing for fully functional end-use metal and plastic parts is becoming increasingly common in rapid manufacturing with industrial-grade processes like direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and selective laser sintering (SLS).

Industrial-grade 3D printing is well suited to produce organic shapes, like this nylon turbine (left) and end-use production parts such as this titanium drill component (right).

With an expanding material selection and improving material properties, designers and engineers have another good option for small quantities of production parts.

Accordingly, our monthly design tip covers this emerging trend.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Choosing the best 3D printing process for your application
  • Selecting the right thermoplastic and metal materials
  • Designing part geometry for 3D printing
  • Using SL, SLS, and DMLS for end-use production parts

READ FULL DESIGN TIP