EYE ON INNOVATION: Smart Glasses For Cyclists, Runners Sprint Beyond Funding Goal

A consumer version of innovative eyewear for cyclists and runners, originally created for U.S. Special Forces, is setting a breakaway funding pace on Indiegogo, the global crowdfunding site.

Ctrl, a Dutch-subsidiary of Kent, Ohio-based AlphaMicron, has been seeking funding via Indiegogo to develop Ctrl One, a pair of sleek cycling and running “smart glasses” that can change tint from dark to transparent in a fraction of a second, automatically adapting to surrounding lighting conditions.

And just how popular are these glasses on Indiegogo? As of the end of August, $389,982 in pre-sales funding had been raised. That surpasses an initial modest funding goal of $20,000. Continue reading

EYE ON INNOVATION: Coffee Cup Made From Coffee Percolates With Investors

Nearly everyone loves coffee, right? But a coffee cup made from coffee? Really?

As it turns out, this cup is more about being green than any homage to coffee.

Fargo, North Dakota-based c2renew is seeking funds on Kickstarter for its c2cup: a travel coffee mug that’s made from a coffee biocomposite, using 30 percent recycled coffee grounds.

As of this week, the developers, who work out of a business and technology incubator at North Dakota State University, have garnered nearly $8,000 of a modest $20,000 goal, with a little more than a month remaining in the Kickstarter campaign.

We found this project intriguing because c2renew engineers are putting a twist on manufacturing processes like 3D printing and injection molding — and because we love coffee.

To develop the cup, the folks at c2renew created a biocomposite formula that is a hybrid of a bio-based resin and coffee waste. Developers claim that “this coffee biomass not only results in a greener plastic, it also cuts down on cost while maintaining the desired mechanical properties.”

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EYE ON INNOVATION: Nebia Shower Uses Less Water, Makes Big Splash

Apple CEO Tim Cook and Alphabet (Google) Chairman Eric Schmidt are early backers of an eco-friendly shower system that transforms water into a kind of mist-and-water combo in an effort to reduce water consumption.

As Entrepreneur Magazine reports, the shower-head system, from San Francisco-based startup Nebia, is “blowing up on Kickstarter.” You think? As of mid-August, the project had received more than $2.1 million in pledged funds, from nearly 6,000 backers. The original goal was a modest $100,000. The Kickstarter campaign closes September 11.

How does it work? On its website, Nebia explains that its technology “atomizes water” into millions of droplets to create 10 times more surface area than a regular shower, giving you “the best of a steam room and an invigorating shower … you’ve taken thousands of showers, but never one like this.” Nebia claims that those who use the shower system will use 70 percent less water.

Harrison Weber, executive editor of VentureBeat.com, looking a little skeptical (okay, scared), recently agreed to “review” an early Nebia prototype.

As Wired Magazine recently reported, the science behind Nebia is more closely related to how farmers water their fields than how we clean ourselves every day, which, basically, is just a faucet that allows gravity to do all of the work.

Nebia designers repurposed nozzles that are typically used for agriculture, rocket engines, combination engines and other industrial means. The challenge was keeping the mist warm. Many prototypes later, this challenge was met through incorporating a code used for rockets. Designers began using modeling software from the aerospace and automotive industries. Indeed, it may not be just hyperbole when one reviewer of the shower claimed that Nebia’s product “blasts a steamy mist with the force of a miniaturized jet engine.”

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EYE ON INNOVATION: From Phones to Drones with Motorola’s ‘Flying Robots’

In 1973, Motorola demonstrated a prototype of the world’s first portable cellular telephone. By 2004, the company commemorated manufacturing its 30-millionth cell phone.

These days, Chicago-based (Schaumburg) Motorola Solutions, the direct successor to Motorola, Inc., is focusing its business on meeting a growing demand from law enforcement, military and other governmental agencies for high-tech intelligence and data-gathering tools. One prime example: Motorola is getting into the drone biz.

USA Today recently reported that Motorola is partnering with Danvers, Mass.-based CyPhy Works, a developer of tethered drones. These are drones that use a “microfilament tether,” allowing them to be powered through a generator or another power source on the ground and to stay in the air indefinitely.

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EYE ON INNOVATION: Jewelbots Bring Bracelets Up To Code

Compared to a sleek Apple Watch or a sporty Fitbit, the Jewelbot charm bracelet looks rather primitive, says Wired Magazine. Basically, the bracelet, which is intended for tween and teen girls, is a semi-clear, plastic flower charm that slides onto a hair tie-like elastic bracelet.

But look beyond form to function on this one, says Wired, which calls the bracelet an example of “some truly fresh thinking about wearable technology.”

As Jewelbots’ creators contend, these technology-enhanced, programmable wristlets are “friendship bracelets for the iPhone era” that teach girls to code in a fun, engaging way. The charms talk to each other over Bluetooth, and using a Jewelbots smart-phone app, youngsters can program their charms to vibrate or light up when their friends are nearby.

The open-source software exposes users to the possibilities of coding in a fresh way. Using basic engineering logic, girls can program their Jewelbots “to do just about anything they — and their besties-turned-collaborators — dream up, opening their minds to STEM during an age when many lose interest,” according to the Jewelbots’ website.

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