First Journal Issue of 2015

Journal issue 1, 2015

Moving a product through the duration of its life cycle involves many peaks, valleys and pivots. The trail can be difficult to navigate, but our various manufacturing technologies can guide you down the path. In our cover story, we show you how to leverage manufacturing at every stage of a product’s life.

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14 Reasons Why Optical LSR is Good for Lighting Applications

As LEDs increasingly supplant metal filaments in light bulbs, optical LSR — in addition to plastics like polycarbonate and acrylic resins — is replacing glass in many optical applications including lens covers and light pipes.

Optical LSR is a transparent, flexible thermoset material that is replacing glass in many optical applications.

The flexible, transparent material is second in clarity only to glass; it can withstand heat in proximity to high-output LEDs and operate in a range of ambient temperatures. Optical LSR is flexible enough for rough duty, outdoor and automotive use. It also allows for very flexible design including accurate replication of fine features. It can support minor undercuts and negative draft without the need for side-actions, and both thick and thin walls. Designs in this material can often integrate multiple parts into a single unit, combining for example a lens, a clear lens cover and a sealing gasket, reducing the bill of materials for a final assembly.

Proto Labs stocks Dow Corning MS-1002 LSR, a material that has been engineered for molding finely detailed parts for LED applications. Read our full Design Tip to see how optical LSR might help on your next lighting project.

Checking In on Hockey and Manufacturing

A Minnesota Wild hockey puck

Minnesota has formally dubbed itself “The State of Hockey,” a moniker that’s hard to argue with when the headquarters of Minnesota-based Proto Labs is brimming with hometown patriotism for its local team on the brink of advancing to the next round of the NHL playoffs. Hockey even shares some similar language with the manufacturing industry. Checking in hockey is a technique used to “stop or slow down the progress of something undesirable,” like Colorado Avalanche players. Checking in rubber components happens when “short, shallow surface cracks are caused by damaging action.” Both hockey and the molded rubber pucks that are used experience this disruptive nature of checking. Continue reading

For Lego Enthusiasts Young and Old, Everything is Awesome

Lego Vitruvius

Let’s see a show of hands: Who’s built something out of Lego blocks? Yeah, that’s what I thought. Most of us have fond memories of our first Lego creation, and some of us (like myself), have been able to relive that nostalgia through their kids. Not liking Lego is basically the same as not liking cute puppies, ironic mustaches or Justin Timberlake.

Since the 1930s, the cult of Lego has grown for a company that has remained exciting to children yet relevant to grownups. Today, The Lego Group employs a team of master builders who design sets, they have a contingent of 100 Lego Ambassadors from around the world preaching Lego fundamentals, and they work with external Lego Certified Professionals who animate models, curate art exhibits and many other cool endeavors. They have larger-than-life retail stores, theme parks, television series, and most recently, released “The Lego Movie,” a blockbuster (no pun intended) film that has grossed more than $400 million at the box office.

In our latest issue of Proto Labs Journal, read about Lego, its culture and some prototyping parallels that can be gleaned from its philosophy.