EYE ON INNOVATION: Technology Lights Up Annual Met Fashion Gala

Fashion and technology converged earlier this week at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2016 Gala.

At the event Monday night, actress Claire Danes wore a gown that had 30 mini-battery packs sewn into layers of fiber optic woven organza that made the dress glow in the dark (see below).

Photos: CBC

Another highlight, a “cognitive dress,” was the creation of the fashion house Marchesa and IBM’s Watson. It analyzed tweets for the emotion of fans watching the Gala’s red carpet show on social media, and lit up embedded LED lights in corresponding colors.

These and other fashion statements embraced this year’s theme and the title of an exhibit that continues through August 14 at The Met: “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.”

The so-called “cognitive dress,” created by designer Marchesa and IBM technology. Photo: Getty Images

The Met’s Costume Institute exhibit explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready to wear.

More than 170 items, dating from the early 20th century to the present, will feature handmade elements of fashion such as embroidery, pleating, lacework and leather work, alongside versions that incorporate innovative processes, such as 3D printing, computer modeling, bonding and laminating, laser cutting and ultrasonic welding. Continue reading

WEBINAR: Improving Manufacturability with ProtoQuote

Join us for a webinar on improving part manufacturability. Our technical specialist Tony Holtz will demonstrate how to navigate ProtoQuote to optimize your design for 3D printing, CNC machining or injection molding. 

tonyholtz

In case you’re unfamiliar with ProtoQuote, it’s our fully automated quoting and design analysis software. Simply put – it makes your life a whole lot easier. It allows you to know exactly how much a part will cost and provides an analysis of your design within hours.

Sign up and learn how to tap into the full potential of ProtoQuote and its design for manufacturability analysis:

TITLE: Improving Manufacturability with ProtoQuote
DATE:  Thursday, May 26 at 1 p.m. CDT
LINK: Click here to register!

At the end of the presentation, there will be time for a Q&A session.  Have a colleague who might be interested? We’d love to have them join as well. And if you can’t make it at the specified time, you can still register and we’ll send you a recording afterward.

Design Rules Revolution: DMLS Requires New Thought Process

By Heather Thompson, Senior Editor, Medical Design and Outsourcing

As product development speeds up, the design rules are changing. Nowhere is this more apparent when looking at the industrial 3D printing process of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). Direct metal laser sintering is an additive manufacturing technology with significant potential in the medical device space. But it requires a new way of thinking even at the early design phases. In many ways it represents the transition designers must face when looking at new technologies to make medical device design and manufacturing faster and more innovative. 

Internal channels that are impossible to machine are achievable with DMLS.

There are several benefits of DMLS explains Tommy Lynch, metals project manager at Proto Labs Inc., primarily that designers can prototype designs in unusual shapes at both time and cost savings. “DMLS is different from other 3D printing because you are using real metal. Many of these materials have been used for industrial applications for decades.”

Lynch says designers like the process because they can experiment with organic shapes that can’t be readily machined. For example, one intriguing opportunity is the ability to build implantable body parts that are custom fit to the recipient. “These implants would normally need to be delicately built on a 5-axis machine at a high expense,” he says. “Technology exists to scan a person’s actual bone structure, and print a direct DMLS replacement.”

Continue reading

DESIGN TIP: Improving Part Design with Uniform Wall Thickness

Designing parts with consistent wall thickness is a fundamental rule of plastic injection molding, and ignoring it can lead to sink, warp and inaccurate or non-functional parts. Yet the functional requirements of consumer, medical, aerospace and industrial products often leave designers little consideration for the material flow and fill properties of plastic, both of which are at least partially determined by wall thickness.

Pay close attention to rib-to-wall thickness ratios. To prevent sink, the thickness of the rib should be about half of the thickness of the wall.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Guidelines to avoid cosmetic defects associated with thin and thick features
  • Material alternatives to improve wall thickness consistency
  • Important questions to ask about material properties
  • The benefits of design for manufacturability analysis

READ FULL DESIGN TIP

Innovative Catalytic Reactor Incorporates Metal 3D Printing

Minnesota-based start-up Activated Research Company recently launched its flagship product, the Polyarc™ catalytic reactor — built in part with Proto Labs’ 3D printing process of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).

A DMLS stainless steel block that attaches to a gas chromatograph, the reactor accelerates the process of analyzing the composition of matter and is useful in industries ranging from fuel to pharmaceuticals, according to Andrew Jones, a chemical engineer, who, along with former Proto Labs CEO Brad Cleveland, founded Activated Research in 2014.

The Polyarc™ microreactor was 3D printed in stainless steel with direct metal laser sintering technology.

Fans of TV’s “CSI” are likely familiar with a gas chromatograph. The evidence from the crime being investigated goes into the crime lab’s gas chromatograph, the high-tech machine quickly identifies whatever is in it and a dramatic arrest ensues.

That’s great for a TV crime series, but the show glosses over how, in reality, as Jones explains, the chemical or composition analysis is quite expensive and time-consuming.

That’s where the Polyarc™ reactor comes in. It can quickly quantify carbon-containing chemicals in a sample without the slow, costly calibrations of existing methods.

The idea for what would become the Polyarc™ reactor originated with researchers at the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation led by Paul Dauenhauer, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Minnesota. Dauenhauer’s group published a paper proposing a “quantitative carbon detector” based on their research, which received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

For more details on how Proto Labs provided prototypes and production parts for this project, read the complete case study here.