Proto Labs Volunteers Hammer, Saw, Build for Habitat

Nearly 100 employees at Minnesota-based Proto Labs were swinging hammers, pounding nails, sawing, painting, installing floors and more at a new Habitat for Humanity house in the Jordan neighborhood of Minneapolis this week.

Different volunteer crews from various Proto Labs departments each day worked hard and had fun supporting the efforts of Habitat for Humanity, a non-profit organization that helps local families become homeowners for the first time.

Proto Labs volunteers paused for a photo on Thursday before getting back to work installing flooring at a new Habitat for Humanity house in Minneapolis.

10 Random Things About Proto Labs

A CAPACITY FOR GROWTH
Proto Labs started in 1999 in a garage in Long Lake, Minnesota with a single injection molding press. At last count, we’re at more than 600 machines: roughly 400 CNC mills, 150 presses and 50 3D printers.

Injection molding presses line Proto Labs’ production floor.

SORRY ANTARCTICA!
We currently serve more than 160 countries (out of 195) on six continents.

PRO(TO) TIP
Psst. You can get up to 10,000 injection-molded parts with aluminum tooling at Proto Labs, but there’s a good chance we’ll be able to produce part runs well beyond that depending on material and geometry. Just sayin’.

A part built by stereolithography, a 3D printing process we added in 2014.

PERFECT 10
Up until 2014, we had two manufacturing processes: plastic injection molding and CNC milling. By the end of 2015, we’ll have added another EIGHT: three 3D printing processes (stereolithography, selective laser sintering, direct metal laser sintering), CNC turning and injection molding processes for steel, magnesium, liquid silicone rubber and one in the pipeline. It has been a busy two years.

20.5 TFLOPS
The total amount of computing muscle at Proto Labs. What’s a TFLOP? One TFLOP equals a trillion floating point operations per second.

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TIPS WITH TONY: Mold Flow Analysis

Last week we discussed wall thickness by resin types, where we learned the importance of uniform wall thickness and provided a guideline on thickness based on your material selection. Another very useful resource in selecting materials is a mold flow simulator, which tests different resins and how they fill using accurate molding pressure.

Melt Flow Index
All materials have a different melt flow index (MFI), but what does this exactly mean? MFI is a measurement taken on how well a material flows at a high temperature through a specified diameter during a 10 minute test. This measurement for MFI is calculated into grams per 10 mins. Typically, higher numbers mean you have a much better flowing material that can fill thin wall geometry easier. But that doesn’t tell the entire story as a higher MFI doesn’t always mean that you won’t encounter any issues on thin part geometries. All materials have varying melting temperatures, so compare MFI between different families of materials such as polyethylenes and polypropylenes, which have about a 40° difference in testing temperatures.

Knowing the Material
Work with Proto Labs’ customer service engineers (CSEs) as soon as you begin quoting your parts and tell them what material you are considering having the parts produced in. Having this information early allows them to properly analyze part geometry for appropriate wall thickness using the MFI of the selected material. Often times, a part that is too large or has features that are too thin for a selected material will require an increase in wall thickness or an alternative material to be chosen.

Simulation
How does a mold manufacturer know the selected material will work? This is where the software takes over. Proto Labs uses a proprietary ProtoFlow® fill analysis program that is truly unique to our molding technique. We have several available materials that can be tested using a resin’s MFI and your CAD geometry.

The ProtoFlow simulation shows the resin fill of a part through a single gate location at the end of the part and the color represents the part filling through to completion.

After your CAD model has been uploaded, gate location and quantity of gates are selected based on your part’s geometry and material. A simulation is then run by our mold designers to review:

  • gate location
  • knit lines
  • incomplete fill
  • balanced fill
  • and most importantly, fill pressure

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EYE ON INNOVATION: Smart Glasses For Cyclists, Runners Sprint Beyond Funding Goal

A consumer version of innovative eyewear for cyclists and runners, originally created for U.S. Special Forces, is setting a breakaway funding pace on Indiegogo, the global crowdfunding site.

Ctrl, a Dutch-subsidiary of Kent, Ohio-based AlphaMicron, has been seeking funding via Indiegogo to develop Ctrl One, a pair of sleek cycling and running “smart glasses” that can change tint from dark to transparent in a fraction of a second, automatically adapting to surrounding lighting conditions.

And just how popular are these glasses on Indiegogo? As of the end of August, $389,982 in pre-sales funding had been raised. That surpasses an initial modest funding goal of $20,000. Continue reading

Proto Labs Named to Fortune’s 100 Fastest-Growing Companies List

Proto Labs has been named to Fortune Magazine’s 2015 100 Fastest-Growing Companies List, the magazine’s annual compilation of public companies with the best three-year profit, revenue and stock growth.

Our company ranks 75th on Fortune’s list, and is the only Minnesota firm to make the cut.

We join Facebook as first-timers to the rankings. This was the first year Proto Labs was eligible to make the list, given that Fortune only reviews public companies that have been trading continuously since June 20, 2012. Proto Labs went public in February of 2012. Other familiar brands on Fortune’s list this year include Skechers (No. 21), Netflix (No. 46) and Under Armour (No. 62). Lannett, a Philadelphia-based pharmaceuticals company, was named No. 1.

Read our full press release here.