EYE ON INNOVATION: GolfBoard Designers Take a Swing at New Approach to Golf Carts

Our search for innovation has led us to the golf course. Well, it is summer after all.

The makers of GolfBoard claim it is the greatest invention in golf since the graphite shaft and is forever changing the way golfers experience the game. Hyperbole aside, it does look like a fun alternative to riding a golf cart.

The GolfBoard is powered by a lithium-ion battery, and is a fully electric vehicle that golfers basically stand on and steer. Designers incorporated front and back gear boxes that provide power to all four wheels, plus a proprietary “Spring Deck” technology that uses flexible spring plates that provide a smooth ride. The GolfBoard also includes an industrial-grade electric motor and fully enclosed drivetrain for reliability and low maintenance.

More than 200 U.S. courses now offer GolfBoard rentals, and the product has been winning awards, including Best New Product Award at the 2014 PGA Merchandising Show, and the 2016 Best Club Transport Award from Golf Digest Magazine. The magazine calls it “a combination of electronic snowboard and golf cart” that “provides a bit of a workout for those feeling guilty about not walking.”

Beyond the golf course rental market, GolfBoards sell individually for $6,500.

WEBINAR: Designing for Direct Metal Laser Sintering

In our next webinar, we’re focusing on direct metal laser sintering—our industrial 3D printing process for metal parts. Join David Bentley, our DMLS expert, to learn why product designers are turning to DMLS for prototyping and end-use parts. The presentation will include:

  • An overview of DMLS including materials and design guidelines
  • A case study on an innovative bike design
  • An open Q&A session 

TITLE: Designing for 3D Printing: Direct Metal Laser Sintering
DATE: Thursday, August 25 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

Busy that day and can’t make it? Not a problem. You can still register and we’ll send a recording that can be watched on-demand. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.


On-Demand Webinar: How Rapid Prototyping Accelerates Medical Device Development

The latest webinar in our continuing series of rapid manufacturing presentations focuses on rethinking the traditional medical device development cycle. With new prototyping tools available, product designers are accelerating development since they can iterate and test new designs more effectively.

Key Takeaways

  • Strategies to accelerate medical device development cycle
  • Prototyping effectively with rapid manufacturing
  • Reducing risk with design analysis

The webinar can be viewed on-demand here.

Continue reading

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Commercial 3D Printing for Production Parts

Technology in the 3D printing space is advancing at the speed of light—everything from support structure software to material options and properties to ever improving processes. Some simply take these advancements as small steps in the overall progress of 3D printing, but these improvements are significant attributes that add value across industries and applications. 

Nylon handheld device 3D printed with SLS.

Medical and Health Care Development
Industries are adopting this technology for varying applications at very different paces. The health care industry has embraced nearly all forms of printing, but has particularly grasped onto direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). As we discussed last month, DMLS has a solid advantage over other 3D printing processes since it produces functional, production-quality parts from metal powder.  When plastics are concerned, selective laser sintering (SLS) is another additive manufacturing process with production in mind.

Product developers, designers and engineers in the medical and health care industries use many different types of 3D printing technologies, but why?

  • concept modeling and prototyping during early phases of product and device development
  • iterating design often to get parts in hand fast
  • reducing financial and design risks
  • building high-quality assemblies for end users to evaluate and influence human factor designs

CASE STUDY: Brain-Machine Robotics System May Help Paraplegics Walk Again

Proto Labs is helping researchers at the University of Houston move a science fiction concept to a real-world application that may help paraplegics walk again.

A University of Houston research lab is developing a powered exoskeleton that will be part of a futuristic brain-machine robotics system. Proto Labs is helping by providing custom-machined aluminum-joint housings.

Photo Courtesy: University of Houston

A multidisciplinary research team that includes engineers, neuroscientists, health professionals, and students is working to create, from scratch, a powered wearable robotic device that allows those with lower-limb paralysis from spinal injury, disease, or stroke to regain mobility without a walker or canes.

A sci-fi element lives on in the project, which is taking place at the university’s Laboratory for Noninvasive Brain-Machine Interface Systems. As the lab’s futuristic name suggests, the ultimate goal is to allow users to control the exoskeleton—commanding it to go forward or backward, to turn, sit, or stand—using their thoughts instead of a joystick, switches, or external operator typical of other devices.