Augmented Reality Emerges as a Tool for Engineering Design

EYE ON INNOVATION

Virtual reality (VR) may be garnering a lot of media buzz these days, but augmented reality (AR) is gaining traction as a technology that offers practical applications for engineers, designers, and technicians.

Big names are getting involved, too, including Microsoft and Autodesk, which have recently teamed up to pair Microsoft’s HoloLens AR headset with Autodesk’s Fusion 360 engineering design software.

Though still in the formative stages of development, AR-enhanced design software will help developers to visualize designs, view CAD model holograms, and see how new or replacement components and parts might fit on existing products. A recent article in Mechanical Engineering Magazine, for example, showed how AR allowed designers to visualize new motorcycle cladding and a fuel tank cover on an existing bike (see photo).

Photo: Mechanical Engineering Magazine

How does AR work?

Unlike VR, in which you put on glasses or a headset to fully immerse yourself in a virtual world, AR taps into technology to enhance the world around you. Also using glasses or a headset, AR dangles text, graphics, or video into users’ visual fields that describes, or augments, what they are looking at. Continue reading

DESIGN TIP: 6 Ways to Cut Costs with 3D Printing

Reduced cost of development as well as part production can certainly be achieved with industrial 3D printing processes, like selective laser sintering and direct metal laser sintering, but there are a few design rules you need to keep in mind.

Here is DMLS in action, as the machine sinters each layer. This process is repeated layer by layer until the build is complete.

This month’s design tip from Proto Labs discusses:

  • Optimizing part design for 3D printing
  • Embracing non-traditional design techniques like organic features
  • Designing for manufacturability if larger quantities are needed
  • Minimizing overhangs and other unfriendly features
  • Avoiding “over-tolerancing” your parts
  • Factoring in your product’s overall functionality in addition to cost reductions

READ FULL DESIGN TIP.

Webinar: Designing for Overmolding

Join us for a webinar alongside RTP Company as we address common questions related to overmolding. We’ll discuss how to design more durable overmolded parts and what it takes to achieve strong adhesion between your part’s two materials.

gasket-overmolding

Overmolding produces two-material, plastic parts.

The presentation will include the following:

  • 12 key overmolding materials
  • Design factors that determine quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength
  • Differences between low- and high-volume overmolding

TITLE: Overmolding: TPE Multi-Material Molding, Achieving Melt Adhesion
PRESENTER: Steve Brenno, Sr. Product Development Engineer, RTP Company
DATE: Tuesday, November 15 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

And, if you can’t attend, you can still register and receive an on-demand version. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT: Autonomous-Car Tech Already Drives Existing Products

When most of us hear the phrase autonomous vehicles, our thoughts jump right to driverless cars. Some individuals more connected to this space will think about buses, taxis, and shuttle services. But far fewer will actually know that this driverless technology has been implemented successfully for years.

The basic concept of autonomous vehicles is to support charted courses using technology, e.g. software and sensors, to minimize or eliminate the human intervention. One of many examples is Uber’s self-driving fleet that caught a fair amount of attention a few months ago.

Tracking technology and guidance systems from John Deere have been in use by farmers for some time. Photo Courtesy: John Deere

What the general population does not realize is how long the foundation of this technology has been around and how long it has been in service. Large equipment manufacturers like John Deere have been using partial self-driving and/or guidance systems for some time. The operator is able to plot a course for the tracker to follow. For example, farmers have the ability to map out their route to pick a corn field, which could help reduce losses in missed crops and inefficient driver choices.

Another space where similar technology is currently being used is in marine applications, trolling motors for fishing boats.  Minn Kota’s i-pilot is programmable for following a charted route, chasing contours and structure of a lake, holding a single location regardless of factors like wind or current and the ability to retrace is steps. It even contains settings like shallow or deep water warnings—this sounds very similar to lane detection in a car.

The basics for autonomous vehicles are all around us, and well adopted. It is very safe to say product development across industries will have many opportunities to benefit from the tech movement heavily funded by the auto industry. The winners will be defined by who can creatively use this expanding technology packaged in a solution the consumer base desires.  Putting these new products in customer’s hands first will be a key to successful product launches.

How to Design 4 Common Metal 3D Printing Features

Click to watch an on-demand webinar on how to design for direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).

Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is not intended to replace traditional metal manufacturing like casting, metal injection molding, or machining. Rather, it’s a product development tool that opens up new design possibilities. Product designers and engineers commonly rely on metal 3D printing to manufacture complex geometries, reduce the number of components in an assembly, or even lightweight objects.

Here’s a look at how to design 4 common features found in metal 3D-printed parts.

1. Self-Supporting Angles
A self-supporting angle describes the feature’s angle relative to the build plate. The lower the angle, the less the likely it is to support itself.

Support angles built with direct metal laser sintering

Designing support angles no less than 45 degrees will ensure a quality surface finish and detail.

Each material will perform slightly different, but the general rule of thumb is to avoid designing a self-supporting feature that is less than 45 degrees. This tip will serve you well across all available materials. As you can see in the picture above, as the angle decreases, the part’s surface finish becomes rougher and eventually the part will fail if the angle is reduced too far. Continue reading