Meet the Cool Idea! Award Judges: Andy MacInnis

The Cool Idea! Award judges are technologists, innovators, entrepreneurs, instructors, and some are even past Cool Idea! Award recipients. All of our judges have a story worth sharing, so we sat down with each for a quick Q&A to help you get to know them a bit better.

Andy MacInnis is a director at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Andy MacInnis is the technical instructor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He leads the Integrated Design & Management (IDM) track, which takes a hands-on and practical approach to design. Prior to his position at MIT, Andy founded Monster Prototype—a leading go-to model and prototype firm in the Boston area. At Monster Prototype, he consulted companies developing consumer products, medical devices, and footwear.

What are you looking forward to most about being a Cool Idea! Award judge in 2017?
Seeing where inventors find the junction of Need and Solution.

Tell us about your background—what’s something about your professional life that we wouldn’t necessarily know by looking at your LinkedIn profile?
I find the challenge of repairing old things like cars, boats, houses, and bikes rewarding and worthwhile. Continue reading

Video: Industrial 3D printing for Prototyping and Production

It takes more than designing a digital 3D model and pressing the print button to produce quality 3D-printed parts. Understanding material properties, support structures, post-build processing, and the differences between additive manufacturing processes all contribute to the quality of a 3D-printed part.

In this video, you’ll learn how we produce precise and repeatable results across our three industrial 3D printing processes and how you can best leverage additive manufacturing during product development.

 

 

Want to better understand the capabilities and benefits of industrial 3D printing? Check out our resources to learn more.

Webinar Round-Up: 3D Printing Materials, CNC Machining, and More

We wrapped up 2017 with two webinars on rapid manufacturing. First, we discussed how to design efficient parts for CNC machining. Then we shared tips on how to select the right material for your 3D-printed parts. Both are available on demand.

Stay tuned for what’s to come in 2017. We’ll be kicking off the new year by looking at how to leverage on-demand production to reduce manufacturing costs and manage demand volatility.

Proto Labs’ On-Demand Webinars 
Below you’ll find our complete library of webinars—just click the title to watch.

Designing for Rapid Overmolding

  • Design factors that determine the quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength

Designing for 3D Printing: Selective Laser Sintering

  • SLS material considerations
  • Design guidelines for functional prototypes and production parts

How to Choose the Right Thermoplastic Material

  • Factors in thermoplastic material selection
  • Overview of common thermoplastics including the effects of additives

Designing for 3D Printing: Direct Metal Laser Sintering

  •  DMLS design considerations including surface finishes, internal features, stresses, and support requirements.
  • Reducing multi-part assemblies into a single component

Webinar: Selecting the Right Material for 3D Printing

Join Proto Labs’ team of 3D printing application engineers as they share how to navigate the material selection process for three additive manufacturing processes: stereolithography (SL), selective laser sintering (SLS), and direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).

In order to help you understand every variable that goes into selecting the right 3D printing material, the presentation will share:

  • Material properties attainable with SL, SLS, and DMLS
  • When to use each process and common applications
  • 3D printing specifications at Proto Labs

TITLE: Selecting the Right Material for 3D Printing
DATE: Thursday, December 15 at 11 a.m. CST
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

The presentation will conclude with an open Q&A session, so bring your 3D printing questions! Also, please feel free to forward this invite if you have a colleague or friend that may be interested.

A Cloud-Based Future for 3D CAD

3D CAD Design software is increasingly moving to cloud-based models, greatly benefitting product developers and manufacturers alike.

The tools available to designers have changed mightily over the last few decades. Long gone are drafting boards, replaced by progressively more intelligent software and cloud-based collaboration platforms. This new and improved design landscape offers designers, engineers, and OEMs lower development costs and faster time to market, and is an integral part of any digital manufacturing environment.

What’s new in computer-aided design (CAD)? Plenty. Pick any leading CAD software on the market today: Aside from greater intelligence, usability, mobility, and a plethora of cool features that were unavailable even a few years ago, virtually all providers offer or will soon offer cloud-based deployment for their customers.

Case in Point
One of these is PTC Inc., developers of the Creo design suite, WindChill PLM, and a range of other manufacturing software solutions. Paul Sagar, PTC’s vice president of product management, said his company will be offering cloud versions of many of its products by year end, and that moving to the cloud is a logical step for companies struggling with routine maintenance of large software deployments, or needing to invest in new hardware every few years. “High-end cloud solutions eliminate all that effort and expense, while still providing the power associated with on premise CAD installations,” he explained. That power is about to get much stronger as PTC and other CAD providers tighten their embrace of digital manufacturing. For example, ThingWorx, PTC’s industrial internet of things (IIoT) development platform, has been adopted by General Electric and others as part of an industry-wide push toward smarter shop floors, more connected CAD systems, and greater transparency throughout the supply chain.

“From a design perspective, the IIoT and digital manufacturing are going to significantly change the way we do things,” Sagar said. Currently, “we design products in a vacuum. We start with a basic set of requirements, collate whatever historical knowledge is available, and then make assumptions. Those assumptions might cost the business a lot of money.” Continue reading