5 Ways to Improve Part Moldability with Draft

When designing parts for plastic injection molding, applying draft (or a taper) to the faces of the part is critical to improving the moldability of your part. Without it, parts run the risk of poor cosmetic finishes, and may bend, break or warp due to molding stresses caused by the plastic cooling.

Equally important, an absence of draft may prevent parts from ejecting from the mold, damaging not only the parts, but possibly the mold itself — a costly and time-consuming detour.

Chevron arrows indicate surfaces that require draft in Proto Labs’ design for manufacturability (DFM) analysis.

In this month’s design tip, learn how to improve the moldability of your plastic parts by:

  • drafting early and often
  • sticking to the rules of draft
  • factoring in surface finish
  • implementing the core-cavity approach
  • leveraging design for manufacturability analysis

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TIPS WITH TONY: Lessen the Load with Lightweighting

Is weight a concern in your product’s design or functionality? If so, there are a number of ways we can help you reduce component weight by looking at material selection and the method(s) of manufacturing used to produce the parts. You might even save some production dollars.

To learn more about rapid manufacturing’s role in lightweighting for automotive applications, download our free white paper today.

As you probably know, weight reduction is extremely valuable in every industry but more so in automotive, aerospace and electronics industries. The carbon footprint that vehicles of all sizes leave behind is being closely regulated by CAFE Standards — a reduction of 110 lbs., for example, can improve fuel efficiency by 2 percent. With increasingly more electronics becoming mobile, product needs to become lighter while providing the same performance, or improved performance, as their predecessors. Once-heavy laptops or cellphones would not be in their current lightweight, mobile state without advanced materials and technology advancements.

Magnesium
Magnesium offers a weight reduction of 65 percent over steel and 25 percent over aluminum, which seems pretty huge — and it is. This is large reason why automotive and aerospace industries are beginning to introduce magnesium into assemblies. Besides reducing weight, magnesium is non-magnetic, electrically and thermally conductivity, and offers EMI/RFI shielding.

You can either have magnesium parts CNC machined or injection molded at Proto Labs to cover all of your prototyping and low-volume production needs — 1 to 5,000+ parts in 15 days or less.

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3D Printing or Machining for Plastic Parts?

An SL machine displays a final ABS-like part with supports.

There are many questions to consider when determining if your plastic parts should be 3D printed or machined. Can you test form, fit and function by using plastic-like materials or do you require engineering-grade thermoplastics? Do you need a broader selection of plastic materials during protoyping? Is your part geometry simple or complex? What are the cost considerations for both methods?

Our latest April Design Tip takes a closer look at the advantages and disadvantages of both 3D printing and CNC machining.  It aims to help you determine which method is better for your particular application. Continue reading

Design Tip: How to Get Well-Rounded Parts with Lathe

Our new turning technology can help you create cylindrical features.

The launch of CNC turning brings product designers and engineers a new set of machining capabilities for part production at Proto Labs. By adding turning centers to our three-access milling services, we’re able to better machine parts with cylindrical features. Turned parts have excellent surface finish and are typically more cost effective for customers.

Whether you’re developing a new camera lens housing, drive shaft or anything else cylindrical in nature, we may be able to assist. We currently offer parts made from aluminum, steel and stainless steel materials, but are working to expand our options with the impending release of brass and copper and the introduction of plastic later in 2015.

Read our full design tip on CNC turning to see if it’s right for your next project.

There’s a Right Time to “Lay Down” on the Job

 

Imagine that you’re molding a simple straight-sided cup. The traditional approach is to make it in a two-part mold, with the A-side forming the outside of the cup and the B-side forming the inside. As long as both sides are suitably drafted to facilitate ejection, it’s all very simple. But add a C-handle, and it gets a little more complicated. Because the handle acts as an undercut, you’ll lay the cup on its side, form the outside with A- and B-side mold halves meeting at the handle, and use a side-action to form the inside. Continue reading