3D Printing Design Fundamentals

Download “Design Essentials for 3D Printing”

3D printing opens up new design possibilities like hollow parts and complex organic geometries, but it’s still important to keep a few fundamentals in mind to take full advantage of 3D printing’s capabilities.

Understanding materials and processes as well as considerations like support structures and feature resolution are crucial for success. These design essentials will help you make the most out of your 3D-printed parts and accelerate your product development efforts.

In the following guide to 3D printing we focus on these topics:

  • 3D printing prototypes and fully functional, end-use parts
  • Designing for metal 3D printing
  • Comparing additive manufacturing processes
  • Material properties and selection

Click here to download Design Essentials for 3D Printing.

Take Full Advantage of CNC Machining’s Capabilities

Product designers in need of prototypes or end-use parts frequently turn to CNC machining for its quick-turn capabilities. Machining isn’t new, but just like any other digital technology, its functionality has expanded in recent years.

That’s why we assembled some tips for how to get the most out of today’s CNC machining. This will help you design higher quality machined parts and better use CNC machining to bolster your product development efforts.

Our Design Essentials for CNC Machining covers the following topics:

  • Designing cylindrical parts to be turned
  • Threading
  • Transition from 3D printing to machining
  • Outsourcing to a machine shop
  • Cost reduction tips for CNC machine

Click here to download Design Essentials for CNC Machining.

Webinar: Designing for Overmolding

Join us for a webinar alongside RTP Company as we address common questions related to overmolding. We’ll discuss how to design more durable overmolded parts and what it takes to achieve strong adhesion between your part’s two materials.

gasket-overmolding

Overmolding produces two-material, plastic parts.

The presentation will include the following:

  • 12 key overmolding materials
  • Design factors that determine quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength
  • Differences between low- and high-volume overmolding

TITLE: Overmolding: TPE Multi-Material Molding, Achieving Melt Adhesion
PRESENTER: Steve Brenno, Sr. Product Development Engineer, RTP Company
DATE: Tuesday, November 15 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

And, if you can’t attend, you can still register and receive an on-demand version. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

Webinar: Designing for Selective Laser Sintering

This is the final part in our series of “Designing for 3D Printing” webinars. Just as we’ve looked at stereolithography and direct metal laser sintering in previous webinar, this presentation will provide insights into how to design for selective laser sintering (SLS), a discussion on material options, and recommended applications for SLS.

Post build

The presentation will include the following:

  • Comparison of SLS materials
  • Design guidelines for functional prototypes and production parts
  • Moldability considerations for effective development
  • Open Q&A session

TITLE: Designing for 3D Printing: Selective Laser Sintering
PRESENTER: Eric Van Roekel, SLS production manager
DATE: Thursday, October 27 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up  

Can’t make it that day? You can still register and we’ll send you an on-demand version to watch when convenient. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

3D Printing Boosts Rocket Project for Engineering Students

University of Minnesota engineering students are readying a 3D-printed rocket engine for launch sometime later this year, with help from Proto Labs.

This cutaway view of the engine shows the cooling channel, which is one long tube that spirals down inside the wall.

David Deng, a senior aerospace engineering student at the U of M’s Twin Cities campus, is leading the extracurricular effort to design, build, and eventually fly a liquid-propellant rocket as project manager of LPRD Rocketry. The group’s name, pronounced “leopard,” is an acronym for Liquid Propellant Rocketry Design. The group includes aerospace engineering students and others studying electrical engineering, computer science, mechanical engineering, and materials science.

The primary design challenges the group faced included the small overall size of the engine itself, and the need to also somehow incorporate a cooling system inside the engine.

David Deng (right), and the University of Minnesota student group LPRD Rocketry (left).

“The manufacturing of [the rocket engine] is incredibly difficult using conventional methods, especially for a very small engine,” Deng said. “The struggle was how do we [add] a single cooling channel through this entire engine, coiling around the side of it? That’s where Proto Labs came in. 3D printing is essentially the only way to get regenerative cooling on an engine this small and have it be a single channel.”

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