EYE ON INNOVATION: Apollo Mission Pics Show NASA’s Pioneering Spirit

Our quest for innovation this week is a special shout out to those space exploring innovators at NASA.

Last month, more than 40 years after NASA’s historic Apollo missions orbited and landed on the moon, Kipp Teague, an archivist, released thousands of images from those missions on Flickr. Some photos have been previously published, but most have never been seen before.

As the New York Times reported, the archive comes unedited with limited information about the specifics behind each photo. Despite the lack of details, the images — and there are a stunning variety — are a treat to view.

Here are a few from Teague’s giant collection.

Eye on Innovation is a weekly look at cool technology, products and scientific advancements that we’ve mined from crowdsourcing sites and other corners of the Internet.

EYE ON INNOVATION: New Fridge Keeps Cool Without Electricity

A new powerless refrigerator uses evaporation to keep food cool and prevent items from spoiling.

Students from the University of Calgary put a new spin on refrigeration.

Great news for your next camping trip, yes, but even greater news for those parts of the world that are deprived of reliable electricity sources. As reported by Wonderfulengineering.com, for those who live in these regions, refrigeration isn’t just a way to preserve favorite foods, “it is a matter of survival itself…”

The idea for the electricity-free fridge recently captured first place in the Biomimicry Global Design Competition, sponsored by Montana-based Biomimicry Institute, which challenged students and researchers worldwide to develop nature-inspired products that address critical sustainability issues. Continue reading

EYE ON INNOVATION [Halloween Edition]: Surviving Zombies; Plus, Proto Labs’ Zombies

Nothing says Halloween like zombies. As a result, on this Halloween weekend, our Eye on Innovation features a column from the SolidWorks Simulation blog with the scary yet reassuring premise and title, “How an Engineer Survives a Zombie Apocalypse.”

Originally published last year by Desktop Engineering, the blog post offers engineering advice for zombie-proofing your house. As a SolidWorks Simulation, it leads readers through a step-by-step process to board up doors and windows just in case “the undead are stumbling over the horizon” toward your house on the day your car doesn’t start. Continue reading

EYE ON INNOVATION: EPA Rules Fuel Inventive New Gas Can

As a homeowner, have you ever noticed how frequently you’re filling up your gas can in order to fuel your lawn mowers, leaf blowers, snow blowers, chainsaws and more?

The spill-proof SureCan works to make this chore less messy and way more environmentally friendly

Photo from Building-products.com

As a reviewer from Tool-rank.com recently raved, SureCan is “the best gas can I have ever used. It is a gas can that doesn’t leak and doesn’t spill, even when you are trying to use a heavy, full gas can to fill a small chainsaw tank.”

This spill-proofing is especially important these days, given that the EPA has strict new rules regarding gas cans to cut down on spillage and the venting of gas fumes into the atmosphere. Tool-rank.com again: “With these new regulations, the EPA made the cheap and common plastic gas can a thing of the past, which had the side effect of putting some gas can manufacturers out of business. If you have had a hard time finding a cheap gas can, this is why.”

The durable, six-layer, high-density polyethylene container features stainless steel springs, aluminum rivets, viton seals and a self-ventilating feature. SureCan calls its product the greenest red can on the market.

Prices vary: 2.2 gallon can, $37; 5 gallon can, $45.

Eye on Innovation is a weekly look at cool technology, products and scientific advancements that we’ve mined from crowdsourcing sites and other corners of the Internet.

 

EYE ON INNOVATION: Travel Light with Silicone Drinkware

If you’re a camper or day hiker, you’re constantly on the lookout for ultra-light gear for the trail. Add these silicone drinking cups to your pack list.

Photo: Werd.com

They look just like glass, but are unbreakable, won’t weigh down your pack and, yes, they’re made out of silicone.

Portland, Ore.-based outdoor gear manufacturer and outfitter Snow Peak offers these safe, food-grade cups that are, as Werd.com comments on its website, quite versatile: “Hot tea, cold whiskey, they can handle it all.” These cups are available in various sizes, including a highball glass, stemless wine tumbler and rocks glass. Founded in 1958 by Japanese mountaineer Yukio Yamai, Snow Peak strives to, as its website states, “create products that inspire people to enjoy the outdoors, [seeking] harmony between people and nature.”

At Proto Labs, we’re familiar of course with silicone parts and products, because we offer our own quick-turn liquid silicone rubber (LSR) molding process, which can produce various durometers of standard, medical-grade and optically clear silicone parts and products, much like these drinking cups.

Price range for Snow Peak’s cups: $25 to $27.

Eye on Innovation is a weekly look at cool technology, products and scientific advancements that we’ve mined from crowdsourcing sites and other corners of the Internet.