Design Complex Components with Insert Molding

Low-volume injection molding isn’t limited to just simple parts. At Proto Labs, we have the ability to manufacture complicated parts using side-actions, hand-loaded inserts, overmolding, and have now started beta testing our insert molding process.

Instead of a mold that produces a final part using two separate shots like overmolding, insert molding generally consists of a preformed part—often metal—that is loaded into a mold, where it is then overmolded with plastic to create a part with improved functional or mechanical properties.

A threaded insert is placed atop a mold core where plastic is molded over it to form the final component.

Threaded Inserts
One way insert molding is leveraged is with threaded inserts, which reinforce the mechanical properties of plastic parts’ ability to be fastened together, especially over repeated assembly. Self-tapping screws work well with softer plastics, but they can become easily worn and/or cross threaded, and fail to perform well, which results in damaged parts that need to be replaced.

Continue reading

Webinar: Designing for Overmolding

Join us for a webinar alongside RTP Company as we address common questions related to overmolding. We’ll discuss how to design more durable overmolded parts and what it takes to achieve strong adhesion between your part’s two materials.

gasket-overmolding

Overmolding produces two-material, plastic parts.

The presentation will include the following:

  • 12 key overmolding materials
  • Design factors that determine quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength
  • Differences between low- and high-volume overmolding

TITLE: Overmolding: TPE Multi-Material Molding, Achieving Melt Adhesion
PRESENTER: Steve Brenno, Sr. Product Development Engineer, RTP Company
DATE: Tuesday, November 15 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

And, if you can’t attend, you can still register and receive an on-demand version. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

THE ENGINEERIST: Designing with Moldability in Mind

Editor’s Note: The Engineerist is a three-part blog series written by Michael Corr, founder of Los Angeles-based manufacturing consulting firm, DuroLabs. This is part three. The first two installments can be found here.

Intelligence does not automatically equate to experience, and in hardware, product development experience goes a long way.

I was recently hired to take over management of an engineering team at an early-stage company. A team of mechanical, electrical, and firmware engineers was already in place, and while I noticed they were younger than most teams I’ve managed before, I was incredibly impressed with their intelligence and creativity. That energy of young and enthusiastic engineers was a convincing factor for me to accept the position.

An Introduction to Manufacturability
Since the team had already released products to customers, I took a passive approach and just observed the established processes while they worked on the next version of the product. I injected comments and feedback on occasion, but trusted them to repeat their existing methods as they prepared for production. However, the more I got involved in reviewing the designs, I realized there was a common theme across the younger engineers—moldability was not factored into their designs. Many of the mechanical prototype parts coming off the Stratasys desktop 3D printer were designed to satisfy the performance requirements, but would at best, be expensive to manufacture, and at worst, impossible.

Adding draft angles to design helps facilitate ejection of a part from a mold, and improves overall moldability. The exact degrees of draft angles are dependent on part geometries.

I took several of the MEs aside and asked a few direct questions challenging them on how they envisioned an injection mold being designed for their parts. Blank stares were the only answers I received. I pointed out that one design had an undercut and another had no draft angles for clean part ejection. Again, blank stares. That’s when I realized that these engineers had become trained on producing parts using 3D printing tools only. While 3D printing has a made tremendous impact in prototyping and even production-grade parts, it also has its caveats. Continue reading

Overmolding: Chemical and Mechanical Bonding

Learn more about overmolding in our free webinar we’re hosting with RTP Company on Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. CT. REGISTER TODAY!

Overmolding is not a new manufacturing technology, but there is still some confusion about how to design for the two-part process. One of the largest areas to consider? Bonding. A number of materials can be used to overmold components together, but without a chemical bond or mechanical interlock, some overmolded parts won’t stand the test of time.

Chemical Bonding
This bonding process involves two chemically compatible materials that are molded together to form a strong bond with each other. It’s important to note that not all materials play well with one another.

The compatibility chart below indicate whether a chemical or mechanical bond is recommended for key thermoplastic and thermoset materials.

mechanical bonding

Three types of mechanical bonding techniques.

Mechanical Interlocking
What happens when your materials are not compatible, the desired bonding strength cannot be achieved, or you want to ensure your materials don’t peel apart from repeated use? This is where designing a mechanical interlock, which physically holds the overmolded material to the substrate, makes sense. There are many ways to design these into parts (see example), so discuss the options with your manufacturer.

Overmoling

Learn more about overmolding in our free webinar we’re hosting with RTP Company on Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 1 p.m. CT. REGISTER TODAY!

If you have further questions regarding rapid overmolding at Proto Labs, contact one of our application engineers at 877.479.3680 or customerservice@protolabs.com.

VIDEO: Lockheed Martin Drone Takes Flight with help from Proto Labs

The drone market in the U.S. is expected to soar to an $82-billion industry in the next decade, the New York Times recently reported. With that robust market in mind, Lockheed Martin, the aerospace, defense, and technology giant, developed a small, fold-up, lightweight drone, the Indago Quadcopter UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle), turning to Proto Labs for quick-turn prototyping and low-volume production.

Proto Labs’ automated design for manufacturability (DFM) and quoting system was especially helpful in taking the Indago from 3D-printed prototypes to injection-molded parts, and getting finished parts delivered in days and weeks. The video tells the story: