5 Ways to Improve Part Moldability with Draft

When designing parts for plastic injection molding, applying draft (or a taper) to the faces of the part is critical to improving the moldability of your part. Without it, parts run the risk of poor cosmetic finishes, and may bend, break or warp due to molding stresses caused by the plastic cooling.

Equally important, an absence of draft may prevent parts from ejecting from the mold, damaging not only the parts, but possibly the mold itself — a costly and time-consuming detour.

Chevron arrows indicate surfaces that require draft in Proto Labs’ design for manufacturability (DFM) analysis.

In this month’s design tip, learn how to improve the moldability of your plastic parts by:

  • drafting early and often
  • sticking to the rules of draft
  • factoring in surface finish
  • implementing the core-cavity approach
  • leveraging design for manufacturability analysis

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TIPS WITH TONY: Mixing It Up with Plastic Colorants

Proto Labs’ material selection and available color options for thermoplastics can be found online at protolabs.com.

You may require colored resin or transparent coloring for your injection-molded parts, but exactly how much colorant is added and what consistency can you achieve?

Salt-and-Pepper Mix
Proto Labs offers colorant at no charge to most natural, white or clear materials. In most cases, we do this by adding a 3 percent salt-and-pepper mixture of colorant based on weight to the base resin, but on occasion, less colorant is added to transparent resins like polycarbonate.

A 3 percent salt-and-pepper colorant mix is typically used.

 

Since we hand mix the colorant and base resin, you may have a higher or lower concentrate of colorant throughout the order. The injection molding press does a good job of mixing the colorant and base resin when it melts and grinds the resin in the barrel before molding, but it isn’t 100 percent.

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TIPS WITH TONY: Prototyping with Soft Metals

Soft metals — aluminum, magnesium, brass, copper — are available in different grades at Proto Labs depending on the 3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding service chosen. Quantities range from 1 to 5,000+ parts in 1 to 15 business days.

Aluminum engine bracket 3D printed through DMLS.

Aluminum
At Proto Labs, we use the industrial 3D printing process of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) to build parts from soft (and hard) materials like aluminum.

DMLS-built aluminum provides parts with excellent strength-to-weight ratios, temperature and corrosion resistance, and provides good tensile, fatigue creep and rupture strength. With a tensile strength of 37.7 ksi (260 MPa) and a hardness of 47.2 HRB, for example, you are able to have parts produced in nearly any part geometry with features like internal channels or complex undercuts that can’t be manufactured through any other method. And, final parts are still up to 98% dense.

You can also get aluminum parts using CNC machining in 6061 and 7075 grades. 6061 can provide you with improved corrosion resistance and can be welded while 7075 provides you a part that has a higher tensile strength and is harder than 6061.

Do you need a prototype of an aluminum die-cast part? We can mimic aluminum die casting using our stereolithography (SL) process and SLArmor technology. SLArmor uses our DSM Somos (NanoTool) material, applying a nickel metal coating that gives the look and feel of metal without the added strength or weight.

 

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‭Design Essentials for Injection Molding

A good rule of thumb is to apply 1 degree of draft per 1 inch of cavity depth.

‭There are multiple paths to injection molding. Some parts are first prototyped through 3D
‭printing where moldability considerations are of limited concern. Others take a more
‭traditional machining route that allows for iterative testing in engineering-grade materials
‭similar to that of molding. And many simply jump right to injection molding.

‭Before production begins, there are important design considerations that will improve the
‭moldability of the parts, and ultimately, reduce the chance of production hiccups,
‭cosmetic defects and other issues.

In this month’s design tip, we walk through these key design elements:

  • ‭Draft and radii
  • ‭Wall thickness
  • ‭Coring out and ribbing
  • Ramps and gussets
  • ‭Undercuts
  • Gating and ejection

Read the full design tip here.

TIPS WITH TONY: The Right Way to Text

In this week’s tip, we look at best practices for designing text on parts, and answer questions like raised or recessed, which fonts to use and alternative options.

Raised or Recessed?
Features can either be raised up or recessed in to part surfaces, but which way is best? Because molds are machined, we prefer to mill the actual text or logo instead of milling around those features. This allows for faster machining, easier polishing and eliminates very small mold features that may break off.

Please extrude the text/logo features by a minimum of 0.010 in. and a maximum of 0.020 in. This allows your text to be legible and not stick in the features while molding — any deeper and you risk having the text peel off and remain in the mold. So, design raised features on your CAD model to improve moldability during manufacturing and legibility on final parts.

Raised text on part is recommended.

If you must have recessed features on your part, many of the same guidelines still exist, but there is one additional concern that you will need to address in regards to the spacing between characters. Having text recessed on your part now means that the features in the mold are raised and we need to machine between each character. Features with less than 0.125 in. of clearance require spacing between each character at a minimum of 0.020 in. to properly remove all material to ensure the legibility of text.

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