TIPS WITH TONY: Design for Manufacturability (DFM) Analysis

Design for manufacturing (DFM) analysis provides information to not only improve the design of your injection-molded part at Proto Labs, but suggests improvements that can be applied regardless of your manufacturer.

Once you upload your 3D CAD model, you’ll receive an email inside of 24 hours — typically, within only a few hours — that contains a link to your quote. Quotes are generally defined as an estimated cost for a particular service, but arguably, the most valuable information that you receive in your Proto Labs quote is our automated DFM feedback.

The manufacturability feedback addresses considerations like:

  • Draft
  • Wall thickness
  • Undercut regions
  • Thin and thick sections
  • Material flow
  • Design complexity
  • Areas that cannot be manufactured
  • Gating and ejection

Proto Labs specifically uses this information to explain wall thickness and draft based on our manufacturing capabilities to machine an aluminum mold through three-axis CNC milling. These are unique to our manufacturing process, but are great guidelines to improving your part design in general.

Customers often times will begin designing a part with no draft or wall thickness concern and bring this design to our quoting software for a quick review at the end of the day. In many cases, by the time you arrive back at work, you may have your DFM analysis waiting. You can then apply those changes, or speak with one of our experienced customer service engineers who can help explain how to simplify your design or discuss why we have capability issues with how your part is intended.

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How Digital Manufacturing is Changing the Industry Forever

Our current issue of the Proto Labs Journal looks at the convergence of complex software and automated hardware bringing rise to the digital age of manufacturing. Follow the thread of a 3D CAD model from upload to digital analysis to final part, and the massive compute cluster that’s powering it all.

Along with our cover story, read about leveraging low-volume injection molding, the latest in innovative technology we’ve mined from the Internet  and new service offerings at Proto Labs.

Read the full Journal now.

DipJar Puts New Twist on Cashless Tipping

DipJar, a startup with offices in New York City and Boston, digitizes the all too familiar tip jar found at many coffee shops and restaurants. It allows credit and debit card users to leave a tip with a simple swipe of their card, providing service employees with yet another opportunity to collect that well-deserved gratuity.

DipJar lets coffee shop patrons leave quick and easy tips in a single swipe.

At a business where a DipJar is present, customers simply “dip” or insert their card into the device to leave a tip in an amount set by the establishment. The DipJar, which houses a card reader, circuitry and software to complete the cloud-based transaction, displays the amount tipped and makes a “change clinking” sound to notify employees of the payment. DipJar also is positioning the device as a way for charitable organizations to collect donations.

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The Reviews Are In!

We recently published a comprehensive, 72-page “Digital Manufacturing for Dummies” book that covers the benefits of using additive manufacturing (3D printing), CNC machining and injection molding for custom prototyping and low-volume production.

Well, a few editors of industry publications have had a chance to read and review the book. Here’s what they’re saying:

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5 Design Considerations for Multi-Cavity Molds

Moving from a single cavity mold to one that produces two, four or eight parts at once seems like an easy way to increase production volume and reduce part costs. This can be true in many cases, but only if the right steps are taken and the requisite homework done first.

The 3D CAD model for a multi-cavity mold.

Designing a part for multi-cavity molding is not as simple as copying the CAD file for a single-cavity mold multiple times. It’s important to recognize that parts that behave perfectly in single-cavity mold might not play well with others, at least not without first making some tweaks to the part, the process or even the material.

In July’s tip, we look at important design considerations for multi-cavity molds that include gating, side-actions and pick-outs, material flow and how family molds are used differently than multi-cavity tooling.

Read the full design tip here.