EYE ON INNOVATION: ‘Smart’ Backpack Geared For Travelers, Students

More than 35 million Americans are expected to travel this Labor Day weekend. Plus, more than 77 million schoolchildren and college-age students will be getting ready to return to classrooms. The omnipresent backpack—great for traveling and for students—will likely be along for the ride.

These days, backpacks are doing more than just carrying your stuff. Take the iBackPack, which will enable you to connect to the internet, charge your devices, and track your location.

Photo Courtesy: iBackPack

As Gizmo Times reports, the iBackPack includes:

  • Tesla-style battery systems
  • Personal Wi-Fi hot spot that connects to 3G/4G networks
  • Retractable power USB cord
  • GPS tracking system
  • Bluetooth proximity locator—making it easier to find your bag in airports or other crowded locations
  • Bluetooth speaker system
  • Multiple USB connections to charge multiple devices at once.

Storage compartments abound to keep laptops, smart phones, tablets, and documents secure. Plus, it’s water and abrasion resistant, and TSA- and Department of Transportation-compliant.

Photo Courtesy: iBackPack

The product’s crowdfunding success at Indiegogo has been over the top, with nearly $700,000 raised, which is 892 percent of its original funding goal. Funding also has come from Kickstarter and other sources.

Several models of the product are expected to be available by December, ranging in price from $170-$350.

Eye on Innovation is a monthly look at new technology and products.

 

EYE ON INNOVATION: GolfBoard Designers Take a Swing at New Approach to Golf Carts

Our search for innovation has led us to the golf course. Well, it is summer after all.

The makers of GolfBoard claim it is the greatest invention in golf since the graphite shaft and is forever changing the way golfers experience the game. Hyperbole aside, it does look like a fun alternative to riding a golf cart.

The GolfBoard is powered by a lithium-ion battery, and is a fully electric vehicle that golfers basically stand on and steer. Designers incorporated front and back gear boxes that provide power to all four wheels, plus a proprietary “Spring Deck” technology that uses flexible spring plates that provide a smooth ride. The GolfBoard also includes an industrial-grade electric motor and fully enclosed drivetrain for reliability and low maintenance.

More than 200 U.S. courses now offer GolfBoard rentals, and the product has been winning awards, including Best New Product Award at the 2014 PGA Merchandising Show, and the 2016 Best Club Transport Award from Golf Digest Magazine. The magazine calls it “a combination of electronic snowboard and golf cart” that “provides a bit of a workout for those feeling guilty about not walking.”

Beyond the golf course rental market, GolfBoards sell individually for $6,500.

EYE ON INNOVATION: Proto Labs Salutes ‘Smart’ Companies on MIT List

The 50 Smartest Companies for 2016, as compiled by MIT Technology Review in its recent annual list, combine cutting-edge technology with effective business models.

In our on-going quest to seek out and identify innovation in manufacturing and technology, we salute these companies that, as the MIT folks say, “are ‘smart’ in the way they create new opportunities.”

In fact, we’re pleased to serve as a prototyping and low-volumes production parts supplier for a number of these companies (though non-disclosure considerations prevent us from identifying which ones we work with). We do take satisfaction in knowing that our digital manufacturing prowess has, in key ways, helped nurture the innovation these companies are being recognized for.

As the Review reports, some of this year’s stars are giant corporations like Amazon and Alphabet, which, “are using digital technologies to redefine industries.

Others are wrestling with technological changes: companies like Microsoft, Bosch…and Intel.” Automotive leaders such as Toyota and Tesla Motors are also on the list. Plus, you’ll find ambitious startups too, such as 23andMe, an innovator in consumer-accessible DNA testing.

SEE THE MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW LIST HERE.

Eye on Innovation is a monthly look at new technology and products.

EYE ON INNOVATION: Technology Lights Up Annual Met Fashion Gala

Fashion and technology converged earlier this week at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2016 Gala.

At the event Monday night, actress Claire Danes wore a gown that had 30 mini-battery packs sewn into layers of fiber optic woven organza that made the dress glow in the dark (see below).

Photos: CBC

Another highlight, a “cognitive dress,” was the creation of the fashion house Marchesa and IBM’s Watson. It analyzed tweets for the emotion of fans watching the Gala’s red carpet show on social media, and lit up embedded LED lights in corresponding colors.

These and other fashion statements embraced this year’s theme and the title of an exhibit that continues through August 14 at The Met: “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology.”

The so-called “cognitive dress,” created by designer Marchesa and IBM technology. Photo: Getty Images

The Met’s Costume Institute exhibit explores how fashion designers are reconciling the handmade and the machine-made in the creation of haute couture and avant-garde ready to wear.

More than 170 items, dating from the early 20th century to the present, will feature handmade elements of fashion such as embroidery, pleating, lacework and leather work, alongside versions that incorporate innovative processes, such as 3D printing, computer modeling, bonding and laminating, laser cutting and ultrasonic welding. Continue reading

EYE ON INNOVATION: Vertebrae Implants More Proof of 3D Printing’s Place in Med Tech

3D printing and other rapid manufacturing methods continue to transform the med tech industry, as illustrated recently by an Australian neurosurgeon who, in late 2015, removed cancerous vertebrae in a patient and implanted, in their place, printed vertebrae.

The 3D-printed part that would replace the patient’s cancer-ridden vertebrae. Photo: Dailymail.co.uk and ABC News.

Dr. Ralph Mobbs, a neurosurgeon at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, called the procedure a “world first.” The surgery was performed on a patient with chordoma, a rare form of cancer that occurs in the bone of the skull and spine. As Wired UK reports, the 60-year-old patient was affected in the two vertebrae responsible for turning the head — meaning that, if the 15-hour surgery had failed, he would have been left paralyzed.

Because of the position and function of these vertebrae, however, they’re extremely hard to replace — they must be an exact fit. Mobbs decided to 3D print the replacements instead, and worked with Anatomics, an Australian medical device manufacturer, to design and build the implants, which were made from titanium. The company also printed exact anatomical models of the patient’s head for Mobbs to practice on before the surgery. Continue reading