5 Design Considerations for Multi-Cavity Molds

Moving from a single cavity mold to one that produces two, four or eight parts at once seems like an easy way to increase production volume and reduce part costs. This can be true in many cases, but only if the right steps are taken and the requisite homework done first.

The 3D CAD model for a multi-cavity mold.

Designing a part for multi-cavity molding is not as simple as copying the CAD file for a single-cavity mold multiple times. It’s important to recognize that parts that behave perfectly in single-cavity mold might not play well with others, at least not without first making some tweaks to the part, the process or even the material.

In July’s tip, we look at important design considerations for multi-cavity molds that include gating, side-actions and pick-outs, material flow and how family molds are used differently than multi-cavity tooling.

Read the full design tip here.

Design Tip: Leveraging Low-Volume Injection Molding

Investing $50,000 or more in high-volume steel tooling is an inherent financial risk that comes with a move to large-scale production. Compounding the risk is months of idle time as you wait on your steel tool to be ready when you could be iterating part design or even producing products that generate revenue.