A Cloud-Based Future for 3D CAD

3D CAD Design software is increasingly moving to cloud-based models, greatly benefitting product developers and manufacturers alike.

The tools available to designers have changed mightily over the last few decades. Long gone are drafting boards, replaced by progressively more intelligent software and cloud-based collaboration platforms. This new and improved design landscape offers designers, engineers, and OEMs lower development costs and faster time to market, and is an integral part of any digital manufacturing environment.

What’s new in computer-aided design (CAD)? Plenty. Pick any leading CAD software on the market today: Aside from greater intelligence, usability, mobility, and a plethora of cool features that were unavailable even a few years ago, virtually all providers offer or will soon offer cloud-based deployment for their customers.

Case in Point
One of these is PTC Inc., developers of the Creo design suite, WindChill PLM, and a range of other manufacturing software solutions. Paul Sagar, PTC’s vice president of product management, said his company will be offering cloud versions of many of its products by year end, and that moving to the cloud is a logical step for companies struggling with routine maintenance of large software deployments, or needing to invest in new hardware every few years. “High-end cloud solutions eliminate all that effort and expense, while still providing the power associated with on premise CAD installations,” he explained. That power is about to get much stronger as PTC and other CAD providers tighten their embrace of digital manufacturing. For example, ThingWorx, PTC’s industrial internet of things (IIoT) development platform, has been adopted by General Electric and others as part of an industry-wide push toward smarter shop floors, more connected CAD systems, and greater transparency throughout the supply chain.

“From a design perspective, the IIoT and digital manufacturing are going to significantly change the way we do things,” Sagar said. Currently, “we design products in a vacuum. We start with a basic set of requirements, collate whatever historical knowledge is available, and then make assumptions. Those assumptions might cost the business a lot of money.” Continue reading

3D Printing Design Fundamentals

Download “Design Essentials for 3D Printing”

3D printing opens up new design possibilities like hollow parts and complex organic geometries, but it’s still important to keep a few fundamentals in mind to take full advantage of 3D printing’s capabilities.

Understanding materials and processes as well as considerations like support structures and feature resolution are crucial for success. These design essentials will help you make the most out of your 3D-printed parts and accelerate your product development efforts.

In the following guide to 3D printing we focus on these topics:

  • 3D printing prototypes and fully functional, end-use parts
  • Designing for metal 3D printing
  • Comparing additive manufacturing processes
  • Material properties and selection

Click here to download Design Essentials for 3D Printing.

Take Full Advantage of CNC Machining’s Capabilities

Product designers in need of prototypes or end-use parts frequently turn to CNC machining for its quick-turn capabilities. Machining isn’t new, but just like any other digital technology, its functionality has expanded in recent years.

That’s why we assembled some tips for how to get the most out of today’s CNC machining. This will help you design higher quality machined parts and better use CNC machining to bolster your product development efforts.

Our Design Essentials for CNC Machining covers the following topics:

  • Designing cylindrical parts to be turned
  • Threading
  • Transition from 3D printing to machining
  • Outsourcing to a machine shop
  • Cost reduction tips for CNC machine

Click here to download Design Essentials for CNC Machining.

Webinar: Designing for Overmolding

Join us for a webinar alongside RTP Company as we address common questions related to overmolding. We’ll discuss how to design more durable overmolded parts and what it takes to achieve strong adhesion between your part’s two materials.

gasket-overmolding

Overmolding produces two-material, plastic parts.

The presentation will include the following:

  • 12 key overmolding materials
  • Design factors that determine quality of flexible-to-rigid bonds
  • Methodology used to measure bonding strength
  • Differences between low- and high-volume overmolding

TITLE: Overmolding: TPE Multi-Material Molding, Achieving Melt Adhesion
PRESENTER: Steve Brenno, Sr. Product Development Engineer, RTP Company
DATE: Tuesday, November 15 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

And, if you can’t attend, you can still register and receive an on-demand version. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

How to Design 4 Common Metal 3D Printing Features

Click to watch an on-demand webinar on how to design for direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).

Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is not intended to replace traditional metal manufacturing like casting, metal injection molding, or machining. Rather, it’s a product development tool that opens up new design possibilities. Product designers and engineers commonly rely on metal 3D printing to manufacture complex geometries, reduce the number of components in an assembly, or even lightweight objects.

Here’s a look at how to design 4 common features found in metal 3D-printed parts.

1. Self-Supporting Angles
A self-supporting angle describes the feature’s angle relative to the build plate. The lower the angle, the less the likely it is to support itself.

Support angles built with direct metal laser sintering

Designing support angles no less than 45 degrees will ensure a quality surface finish and detail.

Each material will perform slightly different, but the general rule of thumb is to avoid designing a self-supporting feature that is less than 45 degrees. This tip will serve you well across all available materials. As you can see in the picture above, as the angle decreases, the part’s surface finish becomes rougher and eventually the part will fail if the angle is reduced too far. Continue reading