On-Demand Webinar: How Rapid Prototyping Accelerates Medical Device Development

The latest webinar in our continuing series of rapid manufacturing presentations focuses on rethinking the traditional medical device development cycle. With new prototyping tools available, product designers are accelerating development since they can iterate and test new designs more effectively.

Key Takeaways

  • Strategies to accelerate medical device development cycle
  • Prototyping effectively with rapid manufacturing
  • Reducing risk with design analysis

The webinar can be viewed on-demand here.

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WEBINAR: Rapid Prototyping for Accelerated Medical Device Development

In our next webinar, we’re taking a look at medical device development. Specifically, how using rapid manufacturing can accelerate prototyping and get you to FDA submissions more quickly.

The presentation will cover:

  • Reaching validation and FDA  510K approval fast
  • Reducing costs with rapid manufacturing
  • Selecting materials for 3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding

And come prepared with questions! At the end we’ll have an open Q&A session.

TITLE: How Rapid Prototyping Accelerates Medical Device Development
DATE: Thursday, July 28 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

Already have plans that day? That’s okay. We’ll send you an on-demand version that can be watched at any time. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

3D-Printed Parts Help Shape Future of Health Care

Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an industrial 3D printing process that creates intricate, high-quality, fully dense metal parts. Materials that are regularly seen in medical and health care devices — like stainless steel 17-4PH and 316L as well as titanium Ti 6-4 — are available through DMLS.

Small medical components built with DMLS.

This additive manufacturing process has a unique advantage over many other 3D printing processes since it produces functional, end-use metal parts. And it has advantages over traditional machining processes since surgical device development often involves very small, highly detailed components that may be impossible to manufacture by traditional means.

This includes, but not limited to, combining multiple extremely small and detailed parts into one part, which reduces the excess bulk required for assembly. A single complex part will often produce better results than an assembly of simpler components that need to work together.

Imagine the end of an arm gripper for a robotic device that stiches up a patient. These components may be smaller than 0.250 inches but are still required to possess the strength and precision required to tie knots for sutures.

Material selection and manufacturability aside, the health care industry continually strives to improve the patient experience. Keeping each procedure as minimally invasive as possible is a key element with this approach. Using DMLS technology lets surgeons minimize incisions, which, in turn, accelerates patient recovery. This not only improves the patient experience, it reduces the cost to hospitals and insurance companies.

And one of the most important attributes of DMLS? Metal parts can be prototyped within days so you can develop devices much faster and get to submissions, trials and production much quicker.

DMLS is enabling the next generation of medical devices. Don’t miss out.


TIPS WITH TONY: Machining Capabilities for High Performance Parts

Do you know how machining a part from titanium can improve its functionality and performance? How about using key inserts for improved durability to your part. Here are few capabilities and design options to keep in mind for your next machined part.

Titanium machined parts.

Let’s start off with some big news. Previously, we only offered titanium for 3D-printed parts, but it’s now available to customers for machined parts. And, if that wasn’t enough to catch your attention, how does titanium machined parts in as fast as three days sound?

Titanium is extremely strong and boasts a high strength-to-weight ratio. It also has excellent corrosion resistance, high operating temperatures (up to 1,000°F) and is nontoxic.

Titanium has range of applications due to its advanced material properties. Frequently, you’ll find titanium parts in the aerospace, medical, military and marine industries. More specifically, it’s used for parts like rotors, compressor blades, hydraulic systems, surgical equipment, dental and orthopedic implants as well as in military aircrafts due to excellent ballistic characteristics.

The only drawback is the cost of the raw material. It’s more expensive than steel. For this reason, most manufacturers don’t hold a lot of inventory, but that isn’t the case at Proto Labs. We maintain a level of inventory that allows for on-demand milling and turning of titanium parts

Visit our machining materials page for more information.

Key insert for added durability.

Key Inserts
Key inserts are steel threaded inserts commonly used in aluminum parts for added durability. Note that these are different from standard coil inserts as they have an added keyway with a tab inserted to prevent twisting under extreme load.

Key inserts are primarily used by the aerospace and military industries following the military standard of MS51835B. We offer eight thread sizes ranging from #8-32 to ½-13. For a full list, visit our threading page and click the key inserts tab.

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THE SHORT LIST: 5 Med-Friendly Materials

Developing medical devices or health care components? Here’s five good material options to consider.

PEEK, PEI (Ultem) and PPSU (Radel). Attributes: High temperature resistance, creep resistance and works well for applications that require sterilization.

Polycarbonates (Makrolon and LEXAN HP1). Attributes: Good clarity with clear and translucent applications, good impact resistant, and durability.

Medical-grade LSR.

Medical-grade liquid silicone rubber (QP1-250). Attributes: Thermal, electrical and chemical resistance, biocompatibility, and is suitable for skin contact.

Titanium (Ti 6-4). Attributes: Lightweight, temperature and corrosion resistant 3D printed metal used with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process to produce fully functional medical components.

WaterShed XC 11122.

WaterShed XC 11122. Attributes: ABS-like material used to 3D print clear microfluidic parts with sterolithography (SL) process. Resistance to water and humidity, and good for lens and flow-visualization models.

For more information on materials, check out our complete selection at protolabs.com, and to learn more about using rapid manufacturing to develop health care and medical products, read our white paper: Prototyping and Low-Volume Production for Medical Applications.