3D Printing Design Fundamentals

Download “Design Essentials for 3D Printing”

3D printing opens up new design possibilities like hollow parts and complex organic geometries, but it’s still important to keep a few fundamentals in mind to take full advantage of 3D printing’s capabilities.

Understanding materials and processes as well as considerations like support structures and feature resolution are crucial for success. These design essentials will help you make the most out of your 3D-printed parts and accelerate your product development efforts.

In the following guide to 3D printing we focus on these topics:

  • 3D printing prototypes and fully functional, end-use parts
  • Designing for metal 3D printing
  • Comparing additive manufacturing processes
  • Material properties and selection

Click here to download Design Essentials for 3D Printing.

How to Design 4 Common Metal 3D Printing Features

Click to watch an on-demand webinar on how to design for direct metal laser sintering (DMLS).

Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is not intended to replace traditional metal manufacturing like casting, metal injection molding, or machining. Rather, it’s a product development tool that opens up new design possibilities. Product designers and engineers commonly rely on metal 3D printing to manufacture complex geometries, reduce the number of components in an assembly, or even lightweight objects.

Here’s a look at how to design 4 common features found in metal 3D-printed parts.

1. Self-Supporting Angles
A self-supporting angle describes the feature’s angle relative to the build plate. The lower the angle, the less the likely it is to support itself.

Support angles built with direct metal laser sintering

Designing support angles no less than 45 degrees will ensure a quality surface finish and detail.

Each material will perform slightly different, but the general rule of thumb is to avoid designing a self-supporting feature that is less than 45 degrees. This tip will serve you well across all available materials. As you can see in the picture above, as the angle decreases, the part’s surface finish becomes rougher and eventually the part will fail if the angle is reduced too far. Continue reading