How to Select the Right 3D Printing Technology

The term 3D printing encompasses several manufacturing technologies that build parts layer-by-layer. Each vary in the way they form plastic and metal parts and can differ in material selection, surface finish, durability, and manufacturing speed and cost.

Selecting the right 3D printing technology for your application requires an understanding of each process’ strengths and weaknesses and mapping those attributes to your product development needs. Let’s first discuss how 3D printing fits within the product development cycle and then take a look at common 3D printing technologies and the advantages of each.

Metal 3D-printed parts can enable design features not possible with traditional manufacturing processes.

3D Printing for Prototyping and Beyond
It’s safe to say 3D printing is most often used for prototyping. Its ability to quickly manufacture a single part enables product developers to validate and share ideas in a cost-effective manner. Determining the purpose of your prototype will inform which 3D printing technology will be the most beneficial. Additive manufacturing can be suitable for a range of prototypes that span from simple physical models to parts used for functional testing.

Despite 3D printing being nearly synonymous with rapid prototyping, there are scenarios when it’s a viable production process. Typically these applications involve low-volumes and complex geometries. Often, components for aerospace and medical applications are ideal candidates for production 3D printing as they frequently match the criteria previously described. Continue reading

Webinar: How to Design Efficient Parts for Rapid CNC Machining

Join us for a live webinar on rapid CNC machining. The presentation, hosted by our technical specialist Tony Holtz, will share how to design quality, machined parts.

During the webinar, you will learn how to:

  • Reduce manufacturing costs by simplifying part design
  • Select materials to improve part functionality
  • Design with moldability in mind to better prepare for injection molding

In addition to general design considerations, we’ll discuss how to leverage rapid manufacturing processes for accelerated product development.

TITLE: Designing for CNC Machining
PRESENTER: Tony Holtz, Technical Specialist at Proto Labs
DATE: Thursday, December 1 at 1 p.m. CST
RSVP: Click here to sign up

If you can’t attend the live event, you can still register to receive an on-demand recording afterward. And, if you have any colleagues that may interested, please feel free to forward this invite.

Take Full Advantage of CNC Machining’s Capabilities

Product designers in need of prototypes or end-use parts frequently turn to CNC machining for its quick-turn capabilities. Machining isn’t new, but just like any other digital technology, its functionality has expanded in recent years.

That’s why we assembled some tips for how to get the most out of today’s CNC machining. This will help you design higher quality machined parts and better use CNC machining to bolster your product development efforts.

Our Design Essentials for CNC Machining covers the following topics:

  • Designing cylindrical parts to be turned
  • Threading
  • Transition from 3D printing to machining
  • Outsourcing to a machine shop
  • Cost reduction tips for CNC machine

Click here to download Design Essentials for CNC Machining.

TIPS WITH TONY: Prototyping with Hard Metals

Last week we discussed prototyping with soft metals like aluminum, copper and brass, so this week we turn our attention to hard metals and processes (3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding) used for rapid prototyping in low volumes.

 

SS 316

SS 17-4

SS 304

Nickel Steel

Steel Alloy

Titanium

Inconel

Cobalt Chrome

DMLS

X

X

 

 

 

X

X

X

CNC

X

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

MIM

X

X

 

X

X

 

 

 

Hard metals that are offered in three different manufacturing processes at Proto Labs: direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), CNC machining (CNC) and metal injection molding (MIM).

Stainless Steel
Stainless steel (SS) is one of the most widely used metals in our material library and is available in three different grades and all three services: 3D printing, machining and molding.

  • 304L is only available for machined parts and offers a higher tensile strength and good corrosion resistance while offering a slightly lower price than other stainless steel materials.
  • 316L is available in machining, industrial 3D printing through direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and metal injection molding (MIM). 316 offers an improved corrosion and chemical resistance over 304 while offering a high temperature tolerance.
  • 17-4PH is also available in all three manufacturing methods and offers a higher yield and tensile strength with good resistances to corrosion. 17-4 also offers a higher magnetism of all our SS offerings.

TIPS WITH TONY: Prototyping with Soft Metals

Soft metals — aluminum, magnesium, brass, copper — are available in different grades at Proto Labs depending on the 3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding service chosen. Quantities range from 1 to 5,000+ parts in 1 to 15 business days.

Aluminum engine bracket 3D printed through DMLS.

Aluminum
At Proto Labs, we use the industrial 3D printing process of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) to build parts from soft (and hard) materials like aluminum.

DMLS-built aluminum provides parts with excellent strength-to-weight ratios, temperature and corrosion resistance, and provides good tensile, fatigue creep and rupture strength. With a tensile strength of 37.7 ksi (260 MPa) and a hardness of 47.2 HRB, for example, you are able to have parts produced in nearly any part geometry with features like internal channels or complex undercuts that can’t be manufactured through any other method. And, final parts are still up to 98% dense.

You can also get aluminum parts using CNC machining in 6061 and 7075 grades. 6061 can provide you with improved corrosion resistance and can be welded while 7075 provides you a part that has a higher tensile strength and is harder than 6061.

Do you need a prototype of an aluminum die-cast part? We can mimic aluminum die casting using our stereolithography (SL) process and SLArmor technology. SLArmor uses our DSM Somos (NanoTool) material, applying a nickel metal coating that gives the look and feel of metal without the added strength or weight.

 

Continue reading