3D Printing Boosts Rocket Project for Engineering Students

University of Minnesota engineering students are readying a 3D-printed rocket engine for launch sometime later this year, with help from Proto Labs.

This cutaway view of the engine shows the cooling channel, which is one long tube that spirals down inside the wall.

David Deng, a senior aerospace engineering student at the U of M’s Twin Cities campus, is leading the extracurricular effort to design, build, and eventually fly a liquid-propellant rocket as project manager of LPRD Rocketry. The group’s name, pronounced “leopard,” is an acronym for Liquid Propellant Rocketry Design. The group includes aerospace engineering students and others studying electrical engineering, computer science, mechanical engineering, and materials science.

The primary design challenges the group faced included the small overall size of the engine itself, and the need to also somehow incorporate a cooling system inside the engine.

David Deng (right), and the University of Minnesota student group LPRD Rocketry (left).

“The manufacturing of [the rocket engine] is incredibly difficult using conventional methods, especially for a very small engine,” Deng said. “The struggle was how do we [add] a single cooling channel through this entire engine, coiling around the side of it? That’s where Proto Labs came in. 3D printing is essentially the only way to get regenerative cooling on an engine this small and have it be a single channel.”

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VIDEO: Lockheed Martin Drone Takes Flight with help from Proto Labs

The drone market in the U.S. is expected to soar to an $82-billion industry in the next decade, the New York Times recently reported. With that robust market in mind, Lockheed Martin, the aerospace, defense, and technology giant, developed a small, fold-up, lightweight drone, the Indago Quadcopter UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle), turning to Proto Labs for quick-turn prototyping and low-volume production.

Proto Labs’ automated design for manufacturability (DFM) and quoting system was especially helpful in taking the Indago from 3D-printed prototypes to injection-molded parts, and getting finished parts delivered in days and weeks. The video tells the story:

 

Rapid Overmolding: Consider These 3 Elements

Injection molding is a common, cost-effective method for manufacturing parts, but, sometimes, those parts need a little help. Low impact or vibration resistance, slippery surfaces, poor ergonomics, and cosmetic concerns are only a few of the reasons why a second molded part is often added as a grip, handle, cover, or sleeve.

Proto Labs now offers rapid overmolding for parts, including the three samples pictured here.

The process of rapid overmolding will get the job done. This method, which Proto Labs now offers, and is the focus of our October design tip, uses a mechanical or chemical bond (or both) to permanently marry two parts together.

This month’s tip discusses:

  • Bonding: A strong bond between the two materials is critical to overmolding.
  • Materials: This is a key consideration in overmolding.
  • Principles: Overmolding uses the same playbook as injection molding, but with a few quirks.

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3D Printing Experts Discuss Technology’s Future

3D printing is the topic of conversation in our latest Journal issue, which focuses on the technology’s next dimension—how additive manufacturing is poised to make a giant leap forward in capabilities.3D printing

The cover story includes interviews with three leaders from the 3D printing industry who offer insight on a variety of topics, such as advancements in new machines and materials, a growing demand for 3D printing for production parts, and notable trends in software.

Another feature, “A Cloud-Based Future for CAD,” explores how 3D CAD design software is increasingly moving to cloud-based models, a trend with benefits for both product developers and manufacturers.

Elsewhere in the Journal, our Eye on Innovation column features a driverless bus, a 3D GoPro, and a DIY Bluetooth.

Read the entire Journal here.

We’re always on the hunt for though-provoking content, so send your cool project or article idea to our editor at angelo.gentile@protolabs.com.

Thanks and enjoy the issue!

DFM Analysis, Injection Molding Help Spring Company Reduce Costs

An Illinois-based steel-spring manufacturer recently called on Proto Labs to help reduce component count and save time and money on a device the company uses to market its services to the aerospace, automotive, oil and gas, and medical industries.

Smalley has long equipped its sales force with a small demo device, a handheld “comparator” that shows the relative size and performance of a wave spring—which Smalley manufactures—compared with a coil spring.

The company turned to Proto Labs for help with solving a cost issue when Smalley considered redesigning the comparator to “use them as ‘giveaways’ to prospective customers,” explained Lane Persky, Smalley marketing manager. “We were looking to go from about 20 of the original comparators, which each cost about $100 to produce, to an initial run of 1,000 redesigned comparators at a target cost of about $15 each.”

Proto Labs’ design for manufacturability (DFM) analysis, and its injection molding service, helped Smalley designers create a new comparator, which would require just seven parts. The original comparators each consisted of 23 parts.

“We chose Proto Labs for the company’s reputation and ability to do both advanced 3D printing for prototyping and affordable, rapid injection molding” for low-volume production, said Persky.

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