EYE ON INNOVATION: Watch for Tech Blitz at Super Bowl 50

Look for lots of high-tech touches at this Sunday’s Super Bowl, organizers have promised. More than 72,000 fans are expected to attend the game at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California near San Francisco, which is home to the NFL’s 49ers.

At the Game
As CNET reports, most of those in attendance will likely be using some sort of mobile device as they look at game statistics and share photos and other content on social media. To handle all of that data, the stadium, which opened in 2014, has 400 miles of fiber and copper cable and 1,200 Wi-Fi access points. The venue has 10 times more bandwidth than the NFL mandates at other stadiums.

Photo: Wired Magazine

On the app side, those at the game can also use NFL Fan Mobile Pass and the Road to 50 apps to help them get around outside and inside the stadium.

Video is also central to the stadium’s technology infrastructure, says the San Francisco Chronicle. A video master control room runs everything that fans see on two giant scoreboards, a video ribbon board along the second deck and 2,400 TV monitors throughout the stadium. The room is filled with about $6 million worth of video equipment, including 4K-resolution ultra-HD cameras, instant replay machines and digital video monitors. Continue reading

Proto Labs Quoting System Helps Lockheed Martin Drone Take Off

The commercial-grade Indago Quadcopter unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or drone, from Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed Martin, is soaring in popularity with law enforcement agencies, defense customers, firefighters, real estate firms, farmers and construction companies.

The high demand stems mostly from the drone’s versatility, range and small, 5-pound, fold-up size, says Miguel Perez, an engineer for Lockheed’s Procerus subsidiary, which developed the drone with prototyping and low-volume production help from Proto Labs.

Lockheed Martin’s Indago drone is a small, 5-pound, fold-up quadcopter capable of work at various ranges — up to 1.5 miles (2.5 kilometers) using integrated antenna solutions — from its ground controller.

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THE SHORT LIST: 6 Ways to Get the Most Out of a Trade Show

As you add to your calendar the various trade shows you’ll be attending in 2016, we offer you this list of a half-dozen quick tips for making the most of those shows.

Check your email; free is good. For many trade shows, you can get a free exhibit hall or expo pass from various companies exhibiting at the show. Watch for emails ahead of the shows with promo codes for these passes from vendors. (See Proto Labs’ code list below).

Proto Labs’ industry specialist, Jeff Schipper, discusses rapid manufacturing at LightFair 2015.

Plan ahead. For large trade shows, look at the event’s website ahead of time to scope out the show’s floor plan, check the exhibitor list and review specific program-track lineups. Some shows are massive, so this advance prep will make your time at these shows more efficient and productive. Continue reading

Honey, I Shrunk the Pyramids: Met Museum, Proto Labs Create Model of Ancient Egypt

For the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition, “Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Middle Kingdom,” on view at the New York museum through Jan. 24, 2016, exhibit planners decided to reconstruct the pyramid complex of King Senwosret III in both a virtual and physical model.

The scale model of the pyramid site is displayed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s galleries.

The physical 1:150-scaled model of the site is based on a 3D virtual model that was produced first, and modeled after 3D-printed prototype parts that were created by Proto Labs. For perspective, the main pyramid of the original complex was more than 206-ft.high. In the scaled model, it is 1.5 feet. The creation of the model, which is intended to bring this important Middle Kingdom era to life for visitors to the exhibition, involved a process that was an intriguing blend of traditional and digital methods. This process included traditional sculpting, model-making, mold-making, casting, carpentry and faux painting, plus digital methods of fabrication, specifically 3D printing. The additive manufacturing process by Proto Labs served as the Met’s prototyping phase that helped replicate the unique parts of the model. Continue reading

EYE ON INNOVATION: Droning Out the Hype at Annual CES

A sandy oasis amid the CES chaos. Photo: Wired.

The 2016 International CES, the annual consumer electronics show in Las Vegas this week, featured its usual giant exhibit hall (2.4 million square feet), a drone rodeo in the nearby Las Vegas desert, Hollywood stars, celebrity chefs, various booze-related ice sculptures, beach volleyball inside the exhibit hall (complete with sand), pro athletes, security dogs that were not to be petted and, oh yeah, product launches from innovative start-ups to icons of the corporate world.

Though some would say the event itself has become a bit overdone — the New York Times calls it “a noisy parade of puffed-up announcements” — the show usually offers a few items worth noting.

USA Today liked several items:

The compact 360fly camera easily captures spherical video. Photo: 360fly.com.

  • The 360fly camera, a baseball-sized, one-lens camera, which takes spherical videos. It doesn’t require complicated editing, and is available for $399.99 at Best Buy.
  • The Parrot Bebop 2, seen flying at the drone rodeo, is an affordable $550 drone that can be operated by a smartphone.
  • A steering wheel attachment for your car that helps curb distracted driving, developed by 20-year-old Tristan Evarts, who says, “Technology can be part of the problem, and part of the solution.” Continue reading