WEBINAR: Designing for Direct Metal Laser Sintering

In our next webinar, we’re focusing on direct metal laser sintering—our industrial 3D printing process for metal parts. Join David Bentley, our DMLS expert, to learn why product designers are turning to DMLS for prototyping and end-use parts. The presentation will include:

  • An overview of DMLS including materials and design guidelines
  • A case study on an innovative bike design
  • An open Q&A session 

TITLE: Designing for 3D Printing: Direct Metal Laser Sintering
DATE: Thursday, August 25 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

Busy that day and can’t make it? Not a problem. You can still register and we’ll send a recording that can be watched on-demand. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

 

On-Demand Webinar: How Rapid Prototyping Accelerates Medical Device Development

The latest webinar in our continuing series of rapid manufacturing presentations focuses on rethinking the traditional medical device development cycle. With new prototyping tools available, product designers are accelerating development since they can iterate and test new designs more effectively.

Key Takeaways

  • Strategies to accelerate medical device development cycle
  • Prototyping effectively with rapid manufacturing
  • Reducing risk with design analysis

The webinar can be viewed on-demand here.

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WEBINAR: Rapid Prototyping for Accelerated Medical Device Development

In our next webinar, we’re taking a look at medical device development. Specifically, how using rapid manufacturing can accelerate prototyping and get you to FDA submissions more quickly.

The presentation will cover:

  • Reaching validation and FDA  510K approval fast
  • Reducing costs with rapid manufacturing
  • Selecting materials for 3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding

And come prepared with questions! At the end we’ll have an open Q&A session.

TITLE: How Rapid Prototyping Accelerates Medical Device Development
DATE: Thursday, July 28 at 1 p.m. CDT
REGISTER: Click here to sign up

Already have plans that day? That’s okay. We’ll send you an on-demand version that can be watched at any time. Also, feel free to forward this invite to your colleagues.

Q&A: Rapid Manufacturing Fit for High-Speed Bike Design

Every year, cyclists converge in Battle Mountain, Nevada in pursuit of achieving speed records at the World Human Powered Speed Challenge (WHPSC). The competition is a mix of athletic performance, engineering and a seemingly endless number of variables. This past fall, Teagan Patterson, a Battle Mountain native and high-speed bicyclist, teamed up with Eric Ware and Mark Anderson to design a bicycle capable of capturing the world record — and her lifelong dream. 

Mark and Eric are veterans of the WHPSC having raced in 2009 with their vehicle, the Wedge, and reaching speeds above 70 mph — good for the eighth fastest time in the world and third fastest in American cycling history.

Drawing from their previous success, they worked with Teagan in preparation for the 2015 WHPSC, where they would try for another record.

Eric Ware knew Proto Labs from his day job as a mechanical engineer, so he decided to call us up for some machined parts for the bicycle design. In this Q&A, Ware gives a look behind-the-scenes at his team’s project.

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3D Printing Methods for Medtech Prototypes

Being able to quickly produce prototype parts is critical to creating an environment of innovation that can lead to medical device market success. By removing inefficiencies, manufacturers should expect to have prototype parts in a few days, not months. The prototype method must be fast enough to allow multiple iterations in a condensed time frame, and possess the scale to allow for multiple iterations at the same time.

Click to enlarge:

Rapid manufacturing methods like 3D printing are leveraged to help drastically reduce development time for medical devices.

Additive manufacturing (AM), also called 3D printing, enables quick evaluation of new medical product designs without making compromises due to complex part geometries. Using AM offers easier design changes and at a low cost. When prototyping via 3D printing, designers should not expect a finished part, although it should be noted 3D printing processes can yield finalized products. Stereolithography, for example, has a number of post-secondary finishing processes and direct metal laser sintering produces fully dense end-use metal parts.

There may be limits to color and texture choices, and in certain instances, thermoplastic-like materials will differ from the final production material used in process like molding and machining. If the surface finish, texture, color and coefficient of friction vary from the end material, it is difficult to accurately assess the subtle needs and benefits of these properties.

The main advantage of 3D printing is that it provides accurate form and fit testing. The build process of additive technology can accurately produce the form and size of the desired part, making it very useful for early evaluation of new medical parts. It is best used to identify design flaws, make changes, and then make second-generation machined parts or invest in tooling to create injection-molded parts. This article reviews that various AM printing methods commonly used in prototyping.

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