Checking In on Hockey and Manufacturing

A Minnesota Wild hockey puck

Minnesota has formally dubbed itself “The State of Hockey,” a moniker that’s hard to argue with when the headquarters of Minnesota-based Proto Labs is brimming with hometown patriotism for its local team on the brink of advancing to the next round of the NHL playoffs. Hockey even shares some similar language with the manufacturing industry. Checking in hockey is a technique used to “stop or slow down the progress of something undesirable,” like Colorado Avalanche players. Checking in rubber components happens when “short, shallow surface cracks are caused by damaging action.” Both hockey and the molded rubber pucks that are used experience this disruptive nature of checking. Continue reading

For Lego Enthusiasts Young and Old, Everything is Awesome

Lego Vitruvius

Let’s see a show of hands: Who’s built something out of Lego blocks? Yeah, that’s what I thought. Most of us have fond memories of our first Lego creation, and some of us (like myself), have been able to relive that nostalgia through their kids. Not liking Lego is basically the same as not liking cute puppies, ironic mustaches or Justin Timberlake.

Since the 1930s, the cult of Lego has grown for a company that has remained exciting to children yet relevant to grownups. Today, The Lego Group employs a team of master builders who design sets, they have a contingent of 100 Lego Ambassadors from around the world preaching Lego fundamentals, and they work with external Lego Certified Professionals who animate models, curate art exhibits and many other cool endeavors. They have larger-than-life retail stores, theme parks, television series, and most recently, released “The Lego Movie,” a blockbuster (no pun intended) film that has grossed more than $400 million at the box office.

In our latest issue of Proto Labs Journal, read about Lego, its culture and some prototyping parallels that can be gleaned from its philosophy.